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dc.contributor.authorStreet, Roberten_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-19T18:31:39Z
dc.date.available2012-11-19T18:31:39Z
dc.date.issued2012-11-02
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/45434
dc.descriptionPresented on November 2, 2012 from 4:00 pm-5:00 pm in the Molecular Science and Engineering Building (MoSE) room G011.en_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 65:25 minutes.en_US
dc.descriptionRobert Street's research interests are in large-area electronic materials and devices, including amorphous silicon (a-Si), flat panel x-ray image sensors, and more recently, printed organic semiconductors, flexible electronics, nanowire devices, and solar cells. He is exploring: printing technologies that could replace the photolithographic techniques traditionally used to create thin-film transistors; and solution-based organic materials to create large-area transistor and sensor arrays. His previous work on digital x-ray imaging has been commercialized through PARC spin-off dPix, the world's leading source for high-resolution a-Si sensor arrays that provide the foundation for medical, industrial, military, and security X-ray imaging. dPix was acquired by Trixell (a Siemens Medical/ Phillips Medical/ Thomson-CSF joint venture), Planar Systems, and Varian Medical in 1999. He holds 53 patents and has been honored with the American Physical Society David Adler Award and The American Institute of Physics prize for Industrial Applications of Physics. He has published more than 350 papers and articles and has served as Associate Editor of both the Journal of Materials Research and Solid State Science and Technology. Bob has also served on the National Research Council Committee for Material Science and Engineering, as well as the ICAMS (International Conference on Amorphous and Microcrystalline Semiconductors) Program Committee and International Advisory Committee. Dr. Robert Street holds a Ph.D. and B.S. in physics, both from Cambridge University in England. He joined PARC in 1976.en_US
dc.description.abstractBulk heterojunction organic solar cells have a complex physical structure made up of nanoscale domains of donors and acceptors, each of which is a disordered material. Understanding the electronic properties has proved controversial, with several competing models of transport and recombination. The talk will focus on the role of localized electronic states introduced by the disorder or by impurities. Disorder introduces exponential band tails and deep traps in the electronic structure and experiments show that these play a central role in the electronic transport and recombination mechanisms. Trap creation induced by irradiation is also shown to cause degradation of some solar cells.en_US
dc.format.extent65:25 minutes
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCOPE Distinguished Lecture Seriesen_US
dc.subjectOrganic solar cellsen_US
dc.subjectDisorderen_US
dc.subjectRecombinationen_US
dc.titleDisorder effects in the electronic properties of organic solar cellsen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Center for Organic Photonics and Electronicsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameXerox Corporation. Palo Alto Research Centeren_US


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