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dc.contributor.authorZhang, F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGeorgakakos, Aristidis Peteren_US
dc.contributor.editorCarroll, G. Deniseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-10T21:34:00Z
dc.date.available2013-01-10T21:34:00Z
dc.date.issued2011-04
dc.identifier.isbn0-9794100-2-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/45732
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 2011 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 11, 12, and 13, 2011, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis article describes a climate change and hydrological impact assessment for several basins in Georgia. First, a new statistical technique, Joint Variable Spatial Downscaling (JVSD), is developed to produce high resolution gridded hydrological datasets for the Southeast US from 13 different Global Circulation Models (GCMs). A lumped conceptual watershed model (Georgakakos et al., 2010) is then employed to characterize the hydrologic responses under the historical climate and the future climate scenarios. The historical (baseline) assessment is based on climatic data for the period 1901 through 2009. It consists of running the hydrological models under historical climatic forcing (of precipitation and temperature) for the 109 year period from 1901 to 2009 (in monthly steps). The future assessment consists of running the Georgia watershed models under all A1B and A2 climate scenarios for the period from 2000 through 2099 (100 years) in monthly time steps. For the baseline scenarios and each of the 26 future climate scenarios (i.e., 13 A1B scenarios and 13 A2 scenarios), this study assesses the changes of both climate variables (i.e., precipitation and temperature) and hydrologic variables (i.e., soil moisture, evapotranspiration, and runoff) for each watershed. The results show that: (1) the 26 IPCC future climate scenarios (2000-2099) do not indicate any long term change in average precipitation; (2) the precipitation distribution is expected to “stretch” becoming wetter and drier than that of the historical climate; (3) temperature and potential evapotranspiration (PET) show consistently increasing historical and future trends; (4) soil moisture storage exhibits a declining trend historically and for future climates; and (5) watershed runoff, and thus river flow, exhibits a similar historical decline across all Georgia watersheds.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored by: Georgia Environmental Protection Division U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Water Science Center U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Water Resources Institute The University of Georgia, Water Resources Facultyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2152. The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of The University of Georgia, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Research Institutes Authorization Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-307) or the other conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI2011. Climate and Energyen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectHydrological impact assessmenten_US
dc.subjectGeorgia watershedsen_US
dc.titleClimate and Hydrologic Change Assessment for Georgiaen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Civil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
dc.publisher.originalWarnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgiaen_US


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