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dc.contributor.authorHurst, Amandaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, G. Deniseen_US
dc.contributor.editorCarroll, G. Deniseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-30T21:20:31Z
dc.date.available2013-01-30T21:20:31Z
dc.date.issued2011-04
dc.identifier.isbn0-9794100-2-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/46040
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 2011 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 11, 12, and 13, 2011, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractUnique conditions exist along the Georgia coast due to its position along the South Atlantic Bight that makes estuaries in the region some of the most dynamic and highly productive environments in the Southeastern United States. Understanding the relative abundance and distribution of fishes in these systems is essential for gaining insight into the dynamics of a valuable ecosystem that may be in danger of degradation from anthropogenic impacts and climate change. This study compares the spatial and temporal variability of fishes found in the early archaic period with those found in the 17th, 20th, and 21st centuries along the coast of Georgia between Cumberland Sound and St. Catherines Sound. Modern samples, collected using seining and trawling within the estuary and inshore areas on the eastern side of the barrier islands, were compared to archaic collections on the islands and shell middens between the island and mainland. With few exceptions, highly ubiquitous species in the modern collections were also present in Georgia Bight archaeological collections. Sea catfishes, Ariopsis felis and Bagre marinus, were two of the species missing from the modern collections that were common in the archaic collections. The modern data exhibited seasonal patterns; however, characteristics such as abundance, biomass, diversity, dominance, distribution, and body size were dependent on location as much as on season. These insights may help direct regulations for timing and limits.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored by: Georgia Environmental Protection Division U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Water Science Center U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Water Resources Institute The University of Georgia, Water Resources Facultyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2152. The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of The University of Georgia, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Research Institutes Authorization Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-307) or the other conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI2011. Environmental Protectionen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectCoastal Georgiaen_US
dc.subjectEstuariesen_US
dc.subjectFish populationsen_US
dc.titlePreliminary Analysis of Spatial and Temporal Differences in Modern and Archaic Fish Populations Off Georgia’s Coast Between the Archaic Period and Present Dayen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameAugusta State University (Augusta, Ga.)en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Southern Universityen_US
dc.publisher.originalWarnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgiaen_US


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