Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLanders, Marken_US
dc.contributor.editorCarroll, G. Deniseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-22T20:26:25Z
dc.date.available2013-02-22T20:26:25Z
dc.date.issued2011-04
dc.identifier.isbn0-9794100-24
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/46229
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 2011 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 11, 12, and 13, 2011, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractSedimentation in streams and reservoirs is a growing environmental, engineering, and agricultural issue. Success in managing and solving sedimentation problems requires improving data quality and the understanding of concentration and flux of fluvial suspended sediment. The collection of sediment-transport data, however, has steadily declined in recent decades largely due to high costs and the difficulty of field methods used for data collection. High temporal resolution data are needed to understand and describe many sedimentation processes in smaller and urbanizing watersheds. New sediment-surrogate technologies and methods can be applied to determine fluvial suspended-sediment fluxes and characteristics at higher resolution, with greater automation and potentially lower cost than traditional methods. Research is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to evaluate different sediment-surrogate technologies in comparison to physical sediment samples. A test site at the Yellow River at Gees Mill Road near Conyers, Georgia (USGS streamgage 02207335), is being used to compare operational characteristics and accuracy of sediment surrogates for the estimation of sediment concentration, flux, and size characteristics. The 260 square-mile Yellow River watershed has a population of about one-half million people and increasing urban land use with about 16 percent impervious surfaces in 2000. Since 2009, over 250 physical suspended-sediment samples were collected concurrently with measurements of streamflow, turbidity, laser diffraction, and acoustic backscatter and attenuation. Acoustic signal data were recorded by acoustic Doppler current profilers operating at 1.2, 1.5, and 3.0 megahertz (Fig. 1). Data from this investigation are being used to evaluate and describe sediment-surrogate technologies and methods. Early results indicate that the surrogates function well, with specific advantages for each surrogate with changing sediment and flow conditions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored by: Georgia Environmental Protection Division U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Water Science Center U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Water Resources Institute The University of Georgia, Water Resources Facultyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2152. The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of The University of Georgia, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Research Institutes Authorization Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-307) or the other conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI2011. Environmental Protectionen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectSedimentation abatementen_US
dc.subjectSediment-transport dataen_US
dc.subjectSediment-surrogate technologiesen_US
dc.titleSediment Monitoring Using Surrogate Methodsen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeological Survey (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUSGS Georgia Water Science Centeren_US
dc.publisher.originalWarnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgiaen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record