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dc.contributor.authorJernigan, William J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCavanaugh, M. Steve, Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.editorCarroll, G. Deniseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-26T19:19:39Z
dc.date.available2013-02-26T19:19:39Z
dc.date.issued2011-04
dc.identifier.isbn0-9794100-24
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/46252
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 2011 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 11, 12, and 13, 2011, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe AWWA National Water Loss Control Committee has deemed the use of “unaccounted for water” as a measurement of system efficiency as inaccurate. For years water system managers have considered their system in good shape if their “unaccounted for water” was 10% or less. Recent findings prove that this is not the case for most systems. There is no universal benchmark. One size does not fit all and now there is proof. Cavanaugh & Associates, PA has performed 27 water audit and revenue recovery programs in the Carolinas over the past 2 years. Using this data set, we will demonstrate from our findings that an effective revenue recovery program must have data confidence, a culture of efficiency, and benchmarking & data trending as its foundation. In many cases the data used in preparing water efficiency calculations is not defensible, mainly because systems depend on information that is readily available but inaccurate or information that is pure conjecture. We will show how to improve data confidence in order to quantify and justify water system needs. Armed with this information, water system managers can make financial decisions based on fact, not fiction, and more effectively implement a revenue recovery program instead of throwing good money after bad data.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored by: Georgia Environmental Protection Division U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Water Science Center U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Water Resources Institute The University of Georgia, Water Resources Facultyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2152. The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of The University of Georgia, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Research Institutes Authorization Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-307) or the other conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI2011. Environmental Protectionen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectUnaccounted for wateren_US
dc.subjectWater auditsen_US
dc.subjectRevenue recovery programsen_US
dc.titleGood Money after Bad Data: the Death of “Unaccounted for Water”en_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameCavanaugh & Associatesen_US
dc.publisher.originalWarnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgiaen_US


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