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dc.contributor.authorEvans, Jasonen_US
dc.contributor.authorAbdulhadi, Dinaen_US
dc.contributor.editorCarroll, G. Deniseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-21T20:24:58Z
dc.date.available2013-03-21T20:24:58Z
dc.date.issued2011-04
dc.identifier.isbn0-9794100-2-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/46460
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 2011 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 11, 12, and 13, 2011, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) is a federal law that mandates an approximately 4-fold increase in the consumption of liquid biofuels in the United States by 2022. Georgia has been widely viewed as a potential hotspot for near-term development of a new biofuel industry to help meet these demands, including through first generation fuels such as corn ethanol and biodiesel, but more importantly with large-scale production of cellulosic ethanol and other advanced biofuels. While the biofuels industry has been viewed positively as a potential source of much-needed jobs and home-grown energy, it has also been viewed with some concern due to the uncertain – but potentially significant – water use and nutrient-loading implications of land use intensification. However, a number of recent shocks – including bankruptcies, plant closures, and abandonment of proposed projects – to major players among the biofuels industry in Georgia (and elsewhere) strongly suggest that the emergence of this sector in the State will be delayed significantly from what had been projected immediately after the passage of EISA. From a water resource perspective, this lull provides an important opportunity for basic research into water use and water quality impacts of major biomass feedstocks, integration of feedstock water demands into comprehensive watershed planning, and development of appropriate incentives for low input feedstock production.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored by: Georgia Environmental Protection Division U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Water Science Center U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Water Resources Institute The University of Georgia, Water Resources Facultyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2152. The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of The University of Georgia, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Research Institutes Authorization Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-307) or the other conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI2011. Conservationen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectGeorgia biofuel industryen_US
dc.subjectBiofuel feedstocksen_US
dc.subjectWater useen_US
dc.subjectNutrient-loadingen_US
dc.subjectWater resources research and planningen_US
dc.titleA Bursting Bubble: What the Recent Problems in the Georgia Biofuel Industry Mean for Water Resource Research and Planningen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameCarl Vinson Institute of Government. Environmental Policy Programen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Georgia. School of Ecologyen_US
dc.publisher.originalWarnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgiaen_US


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