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dc.contributor.authorFrederic Kimaiteen_US
dc.contributor.authorGeorgakakos, Aristidis Peteren_US
dc.contributor.editorCarroll, G. Deniseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-21T20:25:00Z
dc.date.available2013-03-21T20:25:00Z
dc.date.issued2011-04
dc.identifier.isbn0-9794100-2-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/46471
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 2011 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 11, 12, and 13, 2011, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis article presents a detailed hydroeconomic modeling tool used to assess potential economic tradeoffs of alternative water resources management policies and development options under different climate scenarios. The tool leverages the strengths of detailed hydrological, water resources, and economic models to accurately represent the complex and multi-objective physical, management, and socio-economic decision processes in a basin. On the supply side, detailed hydrological and water resources assessment models (including operational Turbine Load Dispatching Models, Short and Long Range Reservoir Management and River Simulation Models, Inflow Forecasting Models, Climate Change Assessment Models, and Scenario/Policy Assessment Models) are used to simulate the spatial and temporal water availability in different parts of the basin subject to inflow variability and potential climate change, water use withdrawals and returns, and system constraints imposed by different management policies. On the demand side, detailed economic models based on inductive and deductive water valuation techniques are used to derive marginal economic benefit functions for different water use sectors. The tool is applied to the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee- Flint (ACF) basin in the Southeast US (Figure 1) to assess the economic tradeoffs of two alternative water resources management policies under current and potential future climate conditions. The alternative management policies are the Interim Operations Plan (IOP) used by the US Army Corps of Engineers (US ACE) and a new operational plan proposed by Georgakakos, 2010 (GTIOP). Preliminary results (Figure 2) show that (a) GT-IOP clearly outperforms the current ACF water resources management policy under both historical and future climates; and (b) the ACF basin is likely to experience significant water related economic losses due to potential future climate change unless appropriate mitigation measures are implemented.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored by: Georgia Environmental Protection Division U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Water Science Center U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Water Resources Institute The University of Georgia, Water Resources Facultyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2152. The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of The University of Georgia, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Research Institutes Authorization Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-307) or the other conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI2011. Poster presentationsen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectHydroeconomic modelingen_US
dc.subjectEconomic tradeoffsen_US
dc.subjectAlternative water resources management policiesen_US
dc.titleA Hydro-economic Model for Integrated Water Resources Assessmenten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.publisher.originalWarnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgiaen_US


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