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dc.contributor.authorLasier, Peter J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWashington, John W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHassan, Sayed M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, Thomas M.en_US
dc.contributor.editorCarroll, G. Deniseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-21T20:25:00Z
dc.date.available2013-03-21T20:25:00Z
dc.date.issued2011-04
dc.identifier.isbn0-9794100-2-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/46473
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 2011 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 11, 12, and 13, 2011, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractConcentrations of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) were measured in surface waters and sediments from the Coosa River watershed to examine their distribution downstream of a suspected source. Samples from eight sites were analyzed using liquid chromatographytandem mass spectrometry. To examine PFC bioaccumulation, sediments were also utilized in 28-d exposures with the aquatic oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus. Concentrations increased significantly below a land-application site (LAS) of municipal/industrial wastewater and were further elevated by unknown sources downstream. Comparisons with past surveys indicate improving conditions, but additional information is needed. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) with eight or less carbons were the most prominent in surface waters but those with 10 or more carbons predominated sediment and tissue samples. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was the major homologue in contaminated sediments and tissues followed by perfluorodecanoate, perfluoroundecanoate, perfluorododecanoate, perfluorotridecanoate, and perfluorotetradecanoate. This pattern of sediment PFCs was consistent among sites and reflects homologue concentrations emanating from the LAS. Tissue PFC concentrations repeated patterns observed in the respective sediments but were 4 to 46 times greater depending on the homologue. The tendency of PFCs to bioaccumulate increased with PFCA chain length and the presence of the sulfonate moiety. Bioaccumulation factors indicate that short-chain PFCAs with less than seven carbons may be environmentally benign alternatives in aquatic ecosystems, but sulfonates with four to seven carbons may be as likely to bioaccumulate as PFOS.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored by: Georgia Environmental Protection Division U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Water Science Center U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Water Resources Institute The University of Georgia, Water Resources Facultyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2152. The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of The University of Georgia, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Research Institutes Authorization Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-307) or the other conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI2011. Poster presentationsen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectPerfluorinated chemicalsen_US
dc.subjectSurface watersen_US
dc.subjectSedimentsen_US
dc.subjectBioaccumulationen_US
dc.titlePerfluorinated Chemicals in Surface Waters and Sediments from the Conasauga, Oostanaula, and Coosa Rivers and Their Bioaccumulation in the Aquatic Oligochaete, Lumbriculus Variegatusen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeological Survey (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUnited States. Environmental Protection Agencyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Georgia. Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenamePatuxent Wildlife Research Centeren_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameNational Exposure Research Laboratory (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDaniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resourcesen_US
dc.publisher.originalWarnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgiaen_US


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