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dc.contributor.authorRobertsonShelleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilde, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHaynie, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHerrin, J.en_US
dc.contributor.editorCarroll, G. Deniseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-21T20:25:00Z
dc.date.available2013-03-21T20:25:00Z
dc.date.issued2011-04
dc.identifier.isbn0-9794100-2-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/46478
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 2011 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 11, 12, and 13, 2011, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractEstablished populations of invasive apple snails have been documented in seven southeastern states, including Georgia. Based on recent morphological and genetic analyses, the invasive apple snails collected in Georgia thus far have been identified as Pomacea insularum, the island apple snail. P. insularum is an herbivorous gastropod native to slow-flowing rivers and wetlands of South America. Several species of apple snails are popular aquarium pets, and P. insularum was most likely introduced to the U.S. via aquarium releases. P. insularum has a deep, channeled suture and often exceeds 100 mm in height. Island apple snails lay conspicuous bright pink egg masses on emergent vegetation, which commonly exceed 2000 eggs per clutch. Dense populations of invasive snails are often associated with an absence of aquatic plants, high nutrient concentration, and high phytoplankton biomass in the affected aquatic system. UGA and GA DNR have initiated a project to map the current distribution of P. insularum in Georgia and to evaluate the possible spread and impact of this species on Georgia’s aquatic ecosystems.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored by: Georgia Environmental Protection Division U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Water Science Center U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Water Resources Institute The University of Georgia, Water Resources Facultyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2152. The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of The University of Georgia, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Research Institutes Authorization Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-307) or the other conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI2011. Poster presentationsen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectEcological impactsen_US
dc.subjectInvasive speciesen_US
dc.subjectApple snailen_US
dc.subjectPomacea insularumen_US
dc.titleDistribution, potential spread, and ecological impacts of the invasive apple snail, Pomacea insularum, in Georgiaen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDaniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resourcesen_US
dc.publisher.originalWarnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgiaen_US


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