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dc.contributor.authorKeaton, Gimel (Young Guru)en_US
dc.contributor.authorGaskins, Nettriceen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-25T15:09:26Z
dc.date.available2013-03-25T15:09:26Z
dc.date.issued2013-03-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/46493
dc.descriptionNettrice Gaskins, a doctoral candidate in Georgia Tech’s Digital Media program, conducted an interview and moderated questions with Grammy winning hip-hop audio engineer Young Guru, who engineered 10 of Jay-Z’s 11 albums. The event was presented in collaboration with WREK’s Sci-Fi Lab and sponsored by the School of Music, the College of Architecture, the College of Engineering, the Ivan Allen College, the GVU Center, and the Office of Institute Diversity.en_US
dc.descriptionPresented on March 5, 2013 from 12:00 – 1:00 pm in the Clough Commons 4th floor study areaen_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 56:17 minutes.en_US
dc.description.abstractDigital Media PhD student Nettrice Gaskins had the opportunity to interview with Young Guru and moderate questions on March 5, 2013 from 12:00 – 1:00 pm in the Clough Commons 4th floor study area. Gaskins became interested in getting involved with this event due to her recent participation in the conference Alien Bodies: Race, Space and Sex in the African Diaspora (http://alienbodies.wordpress.com) at Emory University and her interest in the idea of Afrofuturism, which, according to Sanford Biggers (http://www.sanfordbiggers.com), is “a way of re-contextualizing and assessing history and imagining the future of the African Diaspora via science, science fiction, technology, sound, architecture, the visual culinary arts and other more nimble and interpretive modes of research and understanding.” “During Pressor Alondra Nelson’s keynote, who is one of the leading Afrofuturism scholars, I noted that ‘appropriating technology” such as in hip-hop production is Afrofuturism, thus, science fiction,” Gaskins says. “Music, art, and literature are expressions of agency that empower people who are often missing in mainstream science fiction to envision a different future for themselves. Abdul R. JanMohamed, an Emory professor and moderator at the conference, said that ‘Afrofuturism is about seeing the future as being a vehicle for creating a different present.’ So I contacted the organizers of the Young Guru event and said that I would love to talk about this ‘A-ha!’ moment I had.” The history of hip-hop and the art of audio engineering does have much to teach those of us who study digital media and how it influences creativity and culture. “Hip-hop production is at the intersection of creativity, innovation, and culture,” Gaskins explains. “Alondra Nelson wrote in her book Technicolor: Race, Technology, and Everyday Life, that ‘by refunctioning old/obsolete technologies or inventing new uses for common ones, communities in many places have fashioned technologies to fit their needs and priorities. In the process, they have become innovators, create new asethetic forms, new avenues for political action, and new ways to articulate their identities.’ I think that if we study the aspects of hip-hop production we will find keys to engage groups that have low participation in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.” Young Guru, then, becomes an excellent person to ask these questions due to his experience in the field.
dc.format.extent56:17 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectMusicen_US
dc.subjectHip hopen_US
dc.subjectTechnologyen_US
dc.subjectDigital mediaen_US
dc.subjectCultureen_US
dc.subjectUnderrepresented minoritiesen_US
dc.titleYoung Guru and Nettrice Gaskinsen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.typeRecording, oralen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Musicen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Tech Center for Music Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. College of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. College of Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. College of Computingen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. College of Liberal Artsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Literature, Media, and Communicationen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. GVU Centeren_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Office of Institute Diversityen_US


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