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dc.contributor.authorEthier, C. Ross
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-22T18:25:52Z
dc.date.available2013-04-22T18:25:52Z
dc.date.issued2013-04-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/46819
dc.descriptionPresented on April 9, 2013 from 8:30 a.m.-9:30 a.m. at the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience (IBB), room 1128, Georgia Tech.en_US
dc.descriptionC. Ross Ethier is a Professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Georgia Research Alliance Lawrence L. Gellerstedt, Jr. Eminent Scholar in Bioengineering.
dc.descriptionRuntime: 59:45 minutes
dc.description.abstractEyes matter – vision loss is consistently rated as one of the most feared disabilities and blindness imposes huge social and economic costs. Good human vision requires, among other processes, biomechanical homeostasis within the eye itself. In this talk I will discuss the role of biomechanics and mechanobiology in several ocular conditions and processes: emmetropia (the development of the eye to achieve a sharp image on the retina), secondary cataract and glaucoma. The emphasis will be on describing open clinical and basic science problems in ocular biomechanics.en_US
dc.format.extent59:45 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPetit Institute Breakfast Club Seminar Series
dc.subjectBiomechanicsen_US
dc.subjectCataracten_US
dc.subjectGlaucomaen_US
dc.subjectMyopiaen_US
dc.subjectOphthalmologyen_US
dc.titleOcular Biomechanics: Lots of Good Problems Looking for Solutionsen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscienceen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Dept. of Biomedical Engineering
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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