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dc.contributor.authorTownsend, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorGoldberg, Ben
dc.contributor.authorBirmingham, Ryan
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-01T20:53:51Z
dc.date.available2013-05-01T20:53:51Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/46874
dc.description.abstractThis study analyzes economic regressions between the number of organized violent, international and domestic terrorist attacks and various metrics of the economic state of the country of origin. From the literature, it was expected to find that countries with the poorest economies are more likely produce or act as a base of operations for terrorists and may be linked to their violent crimes. Similarly the statistics suggested that there is a negative correlation between these metrics, representing socioeconomic factors such as the total output of the country, the income per person, unemployment, income inequality, and access to government, and the number of organized violent attacks traceable to said country. Since only named organized attacks were evaluated, instances of anomic (spontaneous or unorganized) terrorism are not included.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectEconomic regressionen_US
dc.subjectTerrorismen_US
dc.subjectEconometric analysisen_US
dc.titleWho Will Strike Next And Why? An Economic Regression of Terrorism and Povertyen_US
dc.typeUndergraduate Research Paperen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Economicsen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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