Welcome to this series of lectures of interest to scientists and the general public by international leaders in our understanding of the universe

Recent Submissions

  • Quantum Computing and the Entanglement Frontier 

    Preskill, John (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2019-04-15)
    The quantum laws governing atoms and other tiny objects seem to defy common sense, and information encoded in quantum systems has weird properties that baffle our feeble human minds. John Preskill will explain why he loves ...
  • Planet Nine From Outer Space 

    Batygin, Konstantin (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2019-04-09)
    At the outskirts of the solar system, beyond the orbit of Neptune, lies an expansive field of icy debris known as the Kuiper belt. The orbits of the individual asteroid-like bodies within the Kuiper belt trace out highly ...
  • How a Failed Astrophysics Major Became a Successful Science Writer 

    Lemonick, Michael (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2019-03-12)
    I knew from the time I was a very young child that I wanted to be an astronomer. The dream lasted until I got to college, where I learned to my dismay that I actually had no passion for doing what an astronomer does; what ...
  • The Science of Origami 

    Rocklin, David Zeb (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2019-02-25)
    What kinds of shapes can you make by folding a sheet of paper? How strong can you make them, or how flexible? Although we've been folding paper for centuries, we're still discovering fascinating new answers to these ...
  • Forecasting Turbulence 

    Schatz, Michael F. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-11-26)
    Fluid turbulence is one of the greatest unsolved problems of classical physics (and the subject of a million dollar mathematical (Millenium) challenge). Centuries of research--including Leonardo da Vinci’s observations ...
  • Celebration of 2018 Physics Nobel Prize: Lighting the way with microscopic tractor beams and sculpted laser pulse 

    Curtis, Jennifer; Raman, Chandra; Trebino, Rick (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-10-23)
    The 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics recognizes two breakthrough inventions in laser physics. The first, optical tweezers, allows scientist and engineers to use lasers like the tractor beams of Star Trek to manipulate everything ...
  • Non-Euclidean Virtual Reality 

    Matsumoto, Elisabetta (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-10-15)
    The 2016 confirmation of Einstein's prediction of gravitational waves has put the spotlight back on the importance of curvature for the physics of the universe. While the ability of mass to curve our space has fueled the ...
  • When Will We Find E.T. and What Happens If We Do? 

    Shostak, Seth (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-09-24)
    Are we alone in the universe? The scientific hunt for extraterrestrial intelligence is now well into its fifth decade, and we still haven’t discovered any cosmic company. Could all this mean that finding biology beyond ...
  • Sex, Flies and Video: Communicating Science to the Public in Words and Images 

    Gorman, James (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-03-27)
    Scientists and journalists have similar, but not identical interests in getting information about their work to the public in an appealing, but accurate way. James Gorman will draw on his experience as a New York Times ...
  • Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817: A Multi-sensory Experience of the Universe 

    Cadonati, Laura; Otte, Nepomuk; Taboada, Ignacio (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-02-13)
    August 17, 2017, is a milestone date for astrophysics. For the first time, the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave observatories detected signals from the collision of two neutron stars. The powerful event shook space-time ...
  • Will Evolution and Information Theory Provide The Fundamentals Of Physics? 

    Gates, Sylvester James Jr. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-02-26)
    This presentation will describe an arc in the mathematical/theoretical physics research of the presenter that has traversed concept spaces from equations, to graphical imagery, to coding theory error-correction, and pointing ...
  • From Molecules to Migration: How Quantum Physics Can Explain the Compass of Birds 

    Ritz, Thorsten (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-02-05)
    The world of quantum physics appears mysterious, even spooky, and far removed from everyday phenomena we can observe in the world around us. Especially the realm of living organisms was thought to be far too disorganized ...
  • Einstein's Cosmos and the Quantum: Origin of Space, Time, and Large-Scale Structure of the Universe 

    Ashtekar, Abhay (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2017-11-14)
    For over two millennia, civilizations have pondered over the questions of cosmogenesis. But serious attempts to address them began only with Einstein's discovery of general relativity a century ago. Advances over the past ...
  • The Ig Nobel Prizes and Improbable Research 

    Abrahams, Marc (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2017-10-11)
    The Ig Nobel Prizes honor achievements that make people LAUGH, then THINK. Ten new prizes have been awarded every year since 1991, in gala ceremonies at Harvard and MIT, with winners traveling from around the world, and ...
  • The Physics and Materials Science of Superheroes 

    Kakalios, James (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2017-10-02)
    In 2001 James Kakalios created a Freshman Seminar class at the University of Minnesota entitled: "Everything I Know About Science I Learned from Reading Comic Books." This is a real physics class, that covers topics from ...
  • 10 Years of Southern Stargazing: How Star Trek Changed Everything 

    Burns, Glenn (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2017-04-06)
    This public lecture by Glenn Burns, chief meteorologist of WSB-TV, is one of three events to celebrate 10 Years of Southern Stargazing at the Georgia Tech Observatory. The destination for the 1960s Apollo missions was ...
  • The Square Kilometre Array: Big Telescope, Big Science, Big Data 

    Taylor, Russ (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2017-01-23)
    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a next generation global radio telescope currently undergoing final design by a collaboration of institutions in 11 countries. The SKA will be one of the largest scientific projects ever ...
  • Purls of Wisdom: The Geometry and Topology of Weavables, Wearables and Wallpaper 

    Matsumoto, Elisabetta (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2016-11-28)
    Curved space and bizarre mathematical worlds beyond Euclid’s axioms entered physics with Einstein’s general theory of relativity. But these geometries are all around us, hiding in plain sight, in the guise of familiar ...
  • The Physics of Genes and the Promise of Personalized Medicine 

    Aksimentiev, Alek (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2016-11-17)
    The twenty-first century is poised to see dramatic advances in medicine. The rapid after water and oxygen, is the most famous molecule of life known. This is not surprising, as the eye-catching double helix of DNA carries ...
  • Strange and subtle states of matter – the topological ideas behind the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics 

    Goldbart, Paul M. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2016-11-14)
    The gases, liquids, and solids that humans have known and harnessed since prehistory are human-scale reflections of how atoms and molecules are organized at the atomic scale. This organization is driven by the forces exerted ...

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