Now showing items 1-20 of 43

    • Aeons Before the Big Bang? 

      Penrose, Roger (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2009-03-24)
      There is much impressive observational evidence, mainly from the cosmic microwave background (CMB), for an enormously hot and dense early stage of the universe referred to as the Big Bang. Observations of the CMB are now ...
    • Dark matter, and how we would not be alive without it 

      Abel, Tom (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-08-30)
      Most of the mass in the Universe is of some unknown form of matter. While we have some guesses what it might be we are not sure. In this talk for a non-specialist audience, Professor Abel will explain how observations using ...
    • History of the Universe from the Beginning to End and the James Webb Space Telescope 

      Mather, John C. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-10-22)
      The history of the universe in a nutshell, from the Big Bang to now, and on to the future – John Mather will tell the story of how we got here, how the Universe began with a Big Bang, how it could have produced an Earth ...
    • Spontaneous Rhythms in Nature and Technology 

      Wiesenfeld, Kurt (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-10-25)
      Rhythms abound in the natural world. Spontaneous rhythmic coordination can be essential: our beating heart cells must synchronize precisely – or else! Sometimes, too much coordination is disastrous: brain seizures can occur ...
    • Pattern Formation in Nature: Why is the Universe not Boring? 

      Morris, Stephen (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2013-02-04)
      The universe is not a rigid clockwork, but neither is it formless and random. Instead, it is filled with highly organized, evolved structures that have somehow emerged from the simple rules of physics. Many natural systems ...
    • How the Planck Constant is Better than a Kilogram Artifact, or How the History of Measuring Physics Constants Will Lead to a “New” International System of Metric Units 

      Steiner, Richard (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2013-09-30)
      For over 200 years, the metric system has been the standard for comparing measurements in science and industry. Formal procedures were adopted about 125 years ago to create the International System (SI) of units, and it ...
    • Superposition, Entanglement, and Raising Schrödinger's Cat 

      Wineland, David J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2013-10-21)
      Research on precise control of quantum systems occurs in many laboratories throughout the wor1d, for fundamental research, new measurement techniques, and more recently for quantum information processing. I will briefly ...
    • Baby Galaxies: The First Steps toward the Milky Way 

      Wise, John (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2013-11-18)
      Our Milky Way is a beautiful spiral galaxy and has been constantly growing since the beginning of time. How did the ancestors of the Milky Way form and look in the first billion years of the universe? Before galaxies form, ...
    • Cosmic Rays: Alien Invaders from Outer Space 

      Otte, Nepomuk (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2013-12-02)
      Cosmic rays are microscopic, charged particles that permanently bombard Earth from outer space. 100 years after their discovery their origin is still a mystery. It is also not clear how cosmic rays can obtain energies that ...
    • Illustrated Special Relativity Through its Paradoxes 

      de Pillis, John (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2014-04-02)
      John de Pillis discusses the Fusion of Linear Algebra, Graphics, and Reality. This lecture is a part of the Inquiring Minds Lecture Series.
    • The Astrophysics of Supermassive Black Holes 

      Ballantyne, David (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2014-10-21)
      Black holes are perhaps the most mysterious and enigmatic objects that one can imagine. Their gravitational fields are so strong that light is unable to escape their grasp, and even fundamental quantities such as space ...
    • How Nature Harvests Sunlight: The Physics of Photosynthesis 

      Schulten, Klaus J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2014-11-03)
      Photosynthesis is one of the great-impact inventions of biological evolution. Indeed, life on Earth is fueled energy-wise mainly by sun light. Many, so-called photosynthetic, life forms harvest sun light directly, for ...
    • The Science Behind Animal-Inspired Robotics 

      Sponberg, Simon (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2014-11-10)
      The 21st Century has seen an explosion of bio-inspired technology and devices. Perhaps no where has this approach been more transformative than in the field of mobile robotics. Geckos, snakes, and even cockroaches have ...
    • How to Become a Better Cook by Bringing Science to the Kitchen 

      Yosses, William (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2014-11-12)
      In this talk, we will bring parallels of science and cooking to the fore. Using a wide variety of kitchen cooking techniques whose inner workings on the molecular level can be explained through chemistry and physics we ...
    • Distant Horizons: New Worlds in an Age of Discovery 

      Larson, Shane (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2014-11-18)
      Great voyages of exploration have always been driven in large part by an insatiable curiosity to know what is beyond the furthest horizon you can see. Five hundred years ago, the European exploration of the globe was a ...
    • Using Science to Predict the Future: An Interactive Discussion of Induction and Scientific Reasoning 

      Solomon, Tom (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2015-04-15)
      In the 17th Century, there was a profound scientific revolution, as first Galileo and then Isaac Newton overturned the commonly-accepted Aristotelian principles and replaced them with what we now call the laws of “Classical ...
    • Turning Stars into Gold 

      Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2015-09-14)
      Most beginning chemistry students struggling with the complexities and underlying structure of the Periodic Table will simply accept the existence of the approximately 90 stable elements. Rarely does it occur to them that ...
    • From Urination to Georgia Tech's First Ig Nobel Prize 

      Hu, David (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2015-10-19)
      How long does an elephant urinate? How quickly does a dog shake? How many eyelashes does a camel have? Asking a new and sometimes strange question is arguably the most important step in advancing science, and not any less ...
    • 100 years of Einstein's Gravity 

      Shoemaker, Deirdre; Cadonati, Laura (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2015-11-02)
      Curved spacetime, relativistic time, black holes and gravitational waves are just a few topics in Einstein’s theory of gravity called Special and General Relativity. Professors Cadonati and Shoemaker will take you on a ...
    • The Coffee-Ring Effect and the Physics of Breakfast 

      Yunker, Peter (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2015-11-30)
      As anyone who has ever spilled coffee knows, liquids that contain suspended particles tend to leave ring-shaped stains when they dry. This ubiquitous phenomenon has been observed for thousands of years, but the physics ...