Now showing items 1-20 of 43

    • 10 Years of Southern Stargazing: How Star Trek Changed Everything 

      Burns, Glenn (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2017-04-06)
      This public lecture by Glenn Burns, chief meteorologist of WSB-TV, is one of three events to celebrate 10 Years of Southern Stargazing at the Georgia Tech Observatory. The destination for the 1960s Apollo missions was ...
    • 100 years of Einstein's Gravity 

      Shoemaker, Deirdre; Cadonati, Laura (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2015-11-02)
      Curved spacetime, relativistic time, black holes and gravitational waves are just a few topics in Einstein’s theory of gravity called Special and General Relativity. Professors Cadonati and Shoemaker will take you on a ...
    • Aeons Before the Big Bang? 

      Penrose, Roger (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2009-03-24)
      There is much impressive observational evidence, mainly from the cosmic microwave background (CMB), for an enormously hot and dense early stage of the universe referred to as the Big Bang. Observations of the CMB are now ...
    • The Astrophysics of Supermassive Black Holes 

      Ballantyne, David (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2014-10-21)
      Black holes are perhaps the most mysterious and enigmatic objects that one can imagine. Their gravitational fields are so strong that light is unable to escape their grasp, and even fundamental quantities such as space ...
    • Baby Galaxies: The First Steps toward the Milky Way 

      Wise, John (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2013-11-18)
      Our Milky Way is a beautiful spiral galaxy and has been constantly growing since the beginning of time. How did the ancestors of the Milky Way form and look in the first billion years of the universe? Before galaxies form, ...
    • Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817: A Multi-sensory Experience of the Universe 

      Cadonati, Laura; Otte, Nepomuk; Taboada, Ignacio (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-02-13)
      August 17, 2017, is a milestone date for astrophysics. For the first time, the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave observatories detected signals from the collision of two neutron stars. The powerful event shook space-time ...
    • Celebration of 2018 Physics Nobel Prize: Lighting the way with microscopic tractor beams and sculpted laser pulse 

      Curtis, Jennifer; Raman, Chandra; Trebino, Rick (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-10-23)
      The 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics recognizes two breakthrough inventions in laser physics. The first, optical tweezers, allows scientist and engineers to use lasers like the tractor beams of Star Trek to manipulate everything ...
    • Chaotic Music and Fractal Art: A Glimpse into the Neurophysiology of Aesthetics 

      Glass, Leon (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2016-01-27)
      The enjoyment of music and art are uniquely human experiences. Yet we still do not understand the attributes that lead us to appreciate some artistic works and not others. In this talk I will address how concepts in ...
    • The Coffee-Ring Effect and the Physics of Breakfast 

      Yunker, Peter (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2015-11-30)
      As anyone who has ever spilled coffee knows, liquids that contain suspended particles tend to leave ring-shaped stains when they dry. This ubiquitous phenomenon has been observed for thousands of years, but the physics ...
    • Cosmic Rays: Alien Invaders from Outer Space 

      Otte, Nepomuk (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2013-12-02)
      Cosmic rays are microscopic, charged particles that permanently bombard Earth from outer space. 100 years after their discovery their origin is still a mystery. It is also not clear how cosmic rays can obtain energies that ...
    • Dark matter, and how we would not be alive without it 

      Abel, Tom (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-08-30)
      Most of the mass in the Universe is of some unknown form of matter. While we have some guesses what it might be we are not sure. In this talk for a non-specialist audience, Professor Abel will explain how observations using ...
    • Distant Horizons: New Worlds in an Age of Discovery 

      Larson, Shane (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2014-11-18)
      Great voyages of exploration have always been driven in large part by an insatiable curiosity to know what is beyond the furthest horizon you can see. Five hundred years ago, the European exploration of the globe was a ...
    • Einstein's Cosmos and the Quantum: Origin of Space, Time, and Large-Scale Structure of the Universe 

      Ashtekar, Abhay (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2017-11-14)
      For over two millennia, civilizations have pondered over the questions of cosmogenesis. But serious attempts to address them began only with Einstein's discovery of general relativity a century ago. Advances over the past ...
    • Exploring the Inner Structure of Active Galactic Nuclei by Reverberation 

      Peterson, Bradley M. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2016-10-31)
      The innermost structure of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) consists of an accretion disk surrounding a supermassive black hole and, on somewhat larger scales, rapidly moving diffuse gas. The ultraviolet through near IR ...
    • Forecasting Turbulence 

      Schatz, Michael F. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-11-26)
      Fluid turbulence is one of the greatest unsolved problems of classical physics (and the subject of a million dollar mathematical (Millenium) challenge). Centuries of research--including Leonardo da Vinci’s observations ...
    • From Molecules to Migration: How Quantum Physics Can Explain the Compass of Birds 

      Ritz, Thorsten (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2018-02-05)
      The world of quantum physics appears mysterious, even spooky, and far removed from everyday phenomena we can observe in the world around us. Especially the realm of living organisms was thought to be far too disorganized ...
    • From Urination to Georgia Tech's First Ig Nobel Prize 

      Hu, David (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2015-10-19)
      How long does an elephant urinate? How quickly does a dog shake? How many eyelashes does a camel have? Asking a new and sometimes strange question is arguably the most important step in advancing science, and not any less ...
    • History of the Universe from the Beginning to End and the James Webb Space Telescope 

      Mather, John C. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2012-10-22)
      The history of the universe in a nutshell, from the Big Bang to now, and on to the future – John Mather will tell the story of how we got here, how the Universe began with a Big Bang, how it could have produced an Earth ...
    • How a Failed Astrophysics Major Became a Successful Science Writer 

      Lemonick, Michael (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2019-03-12)
      I knew from the time I was a very young child that I wanted to be an astronomer. The dream lasted until I got to college, where I learned to my dismay that I actually had no passion for doing what an astronomer does; what ...
    • How Nature Harvests Sunlight: The Physics of Photosynthesis 

      Schulten, Klaus J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2014-11-03)
      Photosynthesis is one of the great-impact inventions of biological evolution. Indeed, life on Earth is fueled energy-wise mainly by sun light. Many, so-called photosynthetic, life forms harvest sun light directly, for ...