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dc.contributor.authorStubbs, Desmond D.
dc.contributor.authorLee, Sang-Hun
dc.contributor.authorHunt, William D.
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-17T20:16:21Z
dc.date.available2013-05-17T20:16:21Z
dc.date.issued2005-06
dc.identifier.citationStubbs, D.D.; Lee, S.H. and Hunt, William D., "Vapor phase detection of a narcotic using surface acoustic wave immunoassay sensors," IEEE Sensors Journal, Vol. 5, no.3, pp.335-339 (June 2005).en_US
dc.identifier.issn1530-437X (print)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/46950
dc.description© 2005 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works.en_US
dc.descriptionDOI: 10.1109/JSEN.2005.844541
dc.description.abstractCurrently, the narcotic sniffing dog remains the most accurate, reliable, and widely used sensing technology in the war on drugs. However, recent studies done at the Institute for Biological Detection Systems at Auburn University, Auburn, AL, have shown that in the presence of extraneous odors (nontarget odors), these animals show a higher propensity for so-called false alarms. For this reason, there have been an increasing demand for a portable, highly specific vapor-sensing device capable of distinguishing a target vapor signature in a complex odor. In this paper, we present the results of a series of experiments demonstrating real-time vapor phase detection of cocaine molecules. A distinctive response or signature was observed under laboratory conditions, where the cocaine vapors were presented using an INEL vapor generator and under “field” conditions facilitated by the Georgia Bureau of Investigation Crime Lab. For these experiments, the sensor component was an ST-X quartz resonator with a center frequency of approximately 250-MHz. anti-benzoylecgonine (anti-BZE) antibodies are attached to the electrodes on the device surface via a protein-A cross linker. We observed a large transient frequency shift accompanied by baseline shift with the anti-BZE coated sensor. After repeated experiments and the use of numerous controls, we believe that we have achieved real-time molecular recognition of cocaine molecules.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectCocaine detectionen_US
dc.subjectImmunoassayen_US
dc.subjectMonoclonal antibodyen_US
dc.subjectSurface acoustic waveen_US
dc.subjectSensoren_US
dc.titleVapor phase detection of a narcotic using surface acoustic wave immunoassay sensorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Center for Organic Photonics and Electronicsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Chemistry and Biochemistryen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Electrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.publisher.originalInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/JSEN.2005.844541
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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