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dc.contributor.authorRosemond, Amy D.
dc.contributor.authorSterling, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorWenger, Seth
dc.contributor.editorCarroll, G. Deniseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-21T23:38:00Z
dc.date.available2013-05-21T23:38:00Z
dc.date.issued2009-04
dc.identifier.isbn0-9794100-1-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/46986
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 2009 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 27, 28, and 29, 2009 Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe field of stream bioassessment, using biota as indicators of water quality, arose from decades of studying the impacts of land use change on stream ecosystems and determining differential sensitivity among aquatic organisms. These measures of biotic structure are extremely useful in determining stream impairment. However, we know very little about how changes in biotic structure might be associated with ecosystem functions and services that humans need or desire from intact ecosystems. Examples of such functions and services include organic matter processing rates and retention, fish and macroinvertebrate production, and conversion and uptake of nutrients. Identifying important relationships between structure and function is a first step in studying streams impaired by urbanization as we seek to address ‘which functions’ we require from these systems. Watershed urbanization includes a complex suite of stressors that have been shown to singly affect both structure and function. In many cases, we lack knowledge of mechanisms that drive changes in structure and function and insights into the cases where there are tight linkages and feedbacks between the two. We present a general conceptual model of how stressors associated with urbanization specifically and most likely affect biotic structure, associated ecosystem functions and services, and their linkages in Piedmont streams.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored by: Georgia Environmental Protection Division U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Water Science Center U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Water Resources Institute The University of Georgia, Water Resources Facultyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2152. The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of The University of Georgia, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Research Institutes Authorization Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-307) or the other conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI2009. Water resources planningen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectStream bioassessmenten_US
dc.titleLinkages among biotic structure, function and ecosystem services in urban streamsen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Georgia. School of Ecologyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Georgia. River Basin Centeren_US
dc.publisher.originalWarnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgiaen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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