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dc.contributor.authorMorris, William N.en_US
dc.contributor.editorHatcher, Kathryn J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-05T20:25:51Z
dc.date.available2013-06-05T20:25:51Z
dc.date.issued1999-03
dc.identifier.isbn0-935835-06-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/47226
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 1999 Georgia Water Resources Conference, March 30 and 31, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractAdequate quantities of water for drinking, industrial and agricultural use are essential for maintaining our quality of life. To meet these needs, surface water (from lakes and rivers) or ground water (from wells) is withdrawn, treated and pumped through pipe distribution networks to our homes and businesses. In recent years, the pressures and demands upon our water supplies have increased substantially due to rapid population growth as well as concerns of neighboring states. Meeting current as well as future demands while also protecting the quality of our limited and vital water resources, is a difficult challenge yet it is one that cannot be delayed. In order to accomplish this goal, the many opportunities to conserve water through pro-active programs such as enhanced public education, xeriscaping (water saving landscaping technique), ultralow flow plumbing fixtures, water rates that encourage conservation, etc ... must receive a much higher priority to insure that our water resources are used as efficiently as possible.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by the Institute of Ecology, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2202 with partial funding provided by the U.S. Department of Interior, geological Survey, through the Georgia Water Research Insttitute as authorized by the Water Research Institutes Authorization Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-397). The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of the University of Georgia or the U.S. Geological Survey or the conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI1999. Water Supply Managementen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectRapid population growthen_US
dc.subjectPro-active programs for water conservationen_US
dc.subjectXeriscapingen_US
dc.subjectUltra-low flow plumbing fixturesen_US
dc.titleWater Conservation Regulations and Implementation for the State of Georgiaen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia. Environmental Protection Divisionen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia. Water Resources Management Branchen_US
dc.publisher.originalInstitute of Ecologyen_US


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