Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Susan D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCaughran, Tashia V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPoiger, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Yingboen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrumley, F. Geneen_US
dc.contributor.editorHatcher, Kathryn J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-07T19:52:45Z
dc.date.available2013-06-07T19:52:45Z
dc.date.issued1999-03
dc.identifier.isbn0-935835-06-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/47313
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 1999 Georgia Water Resources Conference, March 30 and 31, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlternative disinfectants, such as ozone, are gaining in popularity due to stricter regulations on chlorination by-products, namely trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). However, there is still much not known about the identity of disinfection by-products (DBPs) from alternative disinfectants, such as ozone. And, therefore, it is not known if these alternatives form DBPs that are more or less harmful than those of chlorine. Because it is currently believed that many of the previously unidentified DBPs are polar in nature, and hence, difficult to extract from water and identify, we have developed a method that can be used to identify polar DBPs. This method involves the use of 2,4- dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatization followed by analysis with liquid chromatography (LC)/negative ionelectrospray mass spectrometry (MS), and will allow the identification of polar aldehydes and ketones in drinking water. This method offers advantages over the currently accepted method using pentafluorobenzylhydroxylamine (PFBHA) derivatization and gas chromatography (GC)/MS analysis. This DNPH-LC/MS method allows for the detection of highly polar carbonyl compounds (with multiple polar substituents) and produces mass spectra and chromatographic behavior that can be used to distinguish between aldehydes and ketones in ozonated water. Using this method, we have successfully analyzed many polar substituted aldehyde and ketone standards and have identified new DBPs from ozone that have not been previously reporteden_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by the Institute of Ecology, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2202 with partial funding provided by the U.S. Department of Interior, geological Survey, through the Georgia Water Research Insttitute as authorized by the Water Research Institutes Authorization Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-397). The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of the University of Georgia or the U.S. Geological Survey or the conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI1999. Water Supply Managementen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectWater disinfectantsen_US
dc.subjectAlternative disinfectantsen_US
dc.subjectOzonationen_US
dc.subjectChemical polarityen_US
dc.subjectDisinfection by-productsen_US
dc.subjectLiquid chromatography–mass spectrometryen_US
dc.titleIdentification of Polar Drinking Water Disinfection By-products With LC/MSen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUnited States. Environmental Protection Agencyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameNational Exposure Research Laboratory (U.S.)en_US
dc.publisher.originalInstitute of Ecologyen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record