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dc.contributor.authorHopkins, Evelyn H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHippe, Daniel J.en_US
dc.contributor.editorHatcher, Kathryn J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-13T20:03:42Z
dc.date.available2013-06-13T20:03:42Z
dc.date.issued1999-03
dc.identifier.isbn0-935835-06-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/47475
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 1999 Georgia Water Resources Conference, March 30 and 31, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has focused on relations between land use and water quality in the Nation's streams. The NAWQA design to assess water-quality conditions is based on monitoring streams located in relatively small watersheds (60-150 square miles) that contain a predominance of a single targeted land use. In some NAWQA study areas, such as the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee- Flint River basin, additional spatial surveys were conducted to evaluate the variability of water-quality conditions within and among watersheds representing each targeted land use. Recently (1996-99), the USGS created a digital land-use and land-cover database for most of the upper Chattahoochee River basin and Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. The new land-use data are more detailed and cover a larger area of Metropolitan Atlanta than previously available data. This paper addresses whether land-use patterns obtained from this new digital database may be used to predict pesticide concentrations along a gradient of urban land use. Preliminary analyses indicate that pesticide concentrations in streams increase as the percentage of the associated watersheds that may be treated with pesticides increases. Three classes of pesticides were investigated: selective pre-emergent herbicides, insecticides, and nonselective herbicides. The relation between land use and pesticide concentrations is substantially better for selective pre-emergent herbicides, the most widely used class of pesticides, than for the other classes. Additional explanatory information is needed to improve these relations.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by the Institute of Ecology, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2202 with partial funding provided by the U.S. Department of Interior, geological Survey, through the Georgia Water Research Insttitute as authorized by the Water Research Institutes Authorization Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-397). The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of the University of Georgia or the U.S. Geological Survey or the conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI1999. Watershed Protectionen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectLand use patternsen_US
dc.subjectUrban landscapesen_US
dc.subjectPredictorsen_US
dc.subjectPesticidesen_US
dc.subjectWater qualityen_US
dc.subjectStream ecosystemsen_US
dc.titleCan Land-use Patterns Serve as a Predictor of Pesticide Occurrence Within an Urban Landscape?en_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeological Survey (U.S.)en_US
dc.publisher.originalInstitute of Ecologyen_US


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