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dc.contributor.authorBriglio, Dave
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-21T16:05:01Z
dc.date.available2013-06-21T16:05:01Z
dc.date.issued2007-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/47918
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 2007 Georgia Water Resources Conference, March 27-29, 2007, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe new millennium brought many new changes, and stormwater management was no exception in the State of Georgia. The new millennium has effected change in many arenas, not the least of which is stormwater management. Minimum compliance is no longer the standard, and stormwater is no longer an afterthought for community planning. For example: 2001 – The State of Georgia completed its Stormwater Management Manual (GSMM), providing a methodology for selecting and implementing Best Management Practices (BMPs) for new development, in accordance with the goal of improving water quality through reduced sediment loads. 2003 – Nationally, Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System program led cities and counties (86 in Georgia) to develop stormwater management programs. 2006 – Stringent measures in the Etowah River Basin were adopted through the Etowah Habitat Conservation Plan to prevent the “taking” of several endangered darters. Over the past few years in the Atlanta metropolitan area, the Metropolitan North Georgia Water Planning District (MNGWPD) developed six model stormwater management ordinances, addressing post-development stormwater management, floodplain management, conservation subdivision / open space development, illicit discharge and illegal connections, litter control, and stream buffer protection. The paper focuses on causes, effects, and remedies leading to the establishment and refinement of administrative procedures, professional trust, proactive approaches, and the elimination of plan implementation obstacles. As a community, we must pool our resources to help enable a positive return on our endeavors. The goal is not only to continually improve the protection and restoration of our streams and watersheds, but also to improve the process.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Natural Resources Conservation Service, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by the Institute of Ecology, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2202. The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of The University of Georgia, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Resources Research Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-397) or the other conference sponsors.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI2007. Stormwateren_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectStormwater managementen_US
dc.subjectWater qualityen_US
dc.subjectMNGWPDen_US
dc.subjectStormwater management ordinancesen_US
dc.titleThe Continuing Evolution of Stormwater Management in Georgiaen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameMACTEC Engineering and Consulting, Inc.en_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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