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dc.contributor.authorHarman, Willen_US
dc.contributor.authorElmore, Julieen_US
dc.contributor.authorEverhart, Richarden_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-23T21:27:42Z
dc.date.available2013-06-23T21:27:42Z
dc.date.issued2007-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/47959
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 2007 Georgia Water Resources Conference, March 27-29, 2007, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractA stream restoration initiative was implemented in the Mitchell River Watershed in the mid 1990’s. The Mitchell River is located in the Piedmont of North Carolina with its headwaters originating along the Blue Ridge escarpment. The watershed scale effort is led by the Natural Resources Conservation Service and a watershed coalition comprised of state and local agencies, private consultants, private industry, non-profits, and land owners. The number one water quality impairment to the Mitchell River is sediment pollution, primarily from streambank erosion along the South Fork Mitchell and Snow Creek, two major tributaries to the Mitchell. Stream restoration using natural channel design techniques has been the primary method used to decrease sediment inputs into the Mitchell River. The first project was implemented in 1996 and work continues today. Currently, over 30,000 feet of stream channels has been restored through the implementation of 14 projects. In 2002, the NC Clean Water Management Trust Fund provided a grant to the Surry Soil and Water Conservation District to study the effectiveness of using natural channel design techniques to improve water quality in the Mitchell River. Five projects were selected for the study ranging from small step pool channels with gravel/cobble beds to low gradient meandering channels with sand/small gravel beds. During the four year study period the project sites have experienced multiple bankfull events, including two hurricanes. Results show that the study sites remain dynamically stable with the majority of cross sections trending towards narrower bankfull widths and increased mean depths. Maximum riffle depths are generally unchanged, while maximum pool depths have increased. The longitudinal profile for the high gradient step pool channel showed an increase in the number of pools present, as well as a decrease in pool to pool spacing. Stream substrate data have shown a trend toward coarsening through reductions in fine sediments. Floodplain deposition was observed on all sites, particularly after the hurricanes on the sites with high sediment supply from upstream sources.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Natural Resources Conservation Service, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by the Institute of Ecology, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2202. The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of The University of Georgia, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Resources Research Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-397) or the other conference sponsors.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI2007. Stormwateren_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectStream restorationen_US
dc.subjectMitchell river watersheden_US
dc.subjectWater qualityen_US
dc.subjectSediment pollutionen_US
dc.subjectChannel designen_US
dc.titleEvaluating Stream Restoration Techniques in the Mitchell Watersheden_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameBuck Engineering Co.en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUnited States. Natural Resources Conservation Serviceen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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