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dc.contributor.authorEntrekin, Sallyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGolladay, Stephen W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRuhlman, Melanie B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHedman, Craigen_US
dc.contributor.editorHatcher, Kathryn J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-24T15:23:02Z
dc.date.available2013-06-24T15:23:02Z
dc.date.issued1999-03
dc.identifier.isbn0-935835-06-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/47970
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 1999 Georgia Water Resources Conference, March 30 and 31, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe steephead streams we studied are springfed, relatively high gradient, and have greater substrate diversity than is typical of most Coastal Plain streams. The study objectives were: 1) to describe the physical characteristics of the streams and quantify the seasonal biodiversity in several streams draining managed forestlands, and 2) test and adapt rapid bioassessment methods. Our results show these streams to have high invertebrate diversity throughout the year with the highest occurring in winter and early spring. The streams and their valleys bad a regionally unique assemblage of plants and animals. Bioassessment values indicated water quality to be fair to good when sampling with the fixed area modified Hess sampler and good to excellent when sampling multiple habitats using a D-frame kicknet. The values were calculated using the rapid assessment methods adapted by SaveOur- Stream (SOS) and the Hilsenhoff Family Biotic Index (FBI). The results of the bioassessment values indicate that the streamside management zones (SMZ's) implemented in these areas of silvicultural activity are effective in maintaining adequate water quality standards and supporting diverse and abundant aquatic life.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by the Institute of Ecology, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2202 with partial funding provided by the U.S. Department of Interior, geological Survey, through the Georgia Water Research Insttitute as authorized by the Water Research Institutes Authorization Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-397). The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of the University of Georgia or the U.S. Geological Survey or the conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI1999. Water Qualityen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectBiomonitoringen_US
dc.subjectWater qualityen_US
dc.subjectBiodiversityen_US
dc.subjectInvertebratesen_US
dc.titleUnique Steephead Stream Segments in Southwest Georgia: Invertebrate Diversity and Biomonitoringen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameJoseph W. Jones Ecological Research Centeren_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameInternational Paper. Southlands Experiment Foresten_US
dc.publisher.originalInstitute of Ecologyen_US


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