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dc.contributor.authorBarczak, Sara
dc.contributor.authorKilpatrick, Rita
dc.contributor.editorHatcher, Kathryn J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-26T21:52:25Z
dc.date.available2013-06-26T21:52:25Z
dc.date.issued2003-04
dc.identifier.isbn0935835083
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/48058
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 2003 Georgia Water Resources Conference, held April 23-24, 2003, at the University of Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe link between Georgia’s energy and water resources is profound. According to state statistics, Georgia’s energy industry is the largest water user, outside of the agricultural sector. Similarly at the national level, the electric industry follows closely on the heels of irrigation as the largest water user in the U.S. Georgia’s electricity supplies threaten state water resources that affect important aspects of the state’s tourism, agriculture and fishing industries. A comparison of different energy supply technologies, including renewable supplies and energy efficiency measures, shows that complementary water and energy saving goals can be met, resulting in net water savings. State water policy needs to support a shift toward sustainable energy practices that conserve rather than squander limited water supplies.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI2003. Georgia water policy and planningen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectSACEen_US
dc.titleEnergy impacts on Georgia’s water resourcesen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameSouthern Alliance for Clean Energyen_US
dc.publisher.originalInstitute of Ecologyen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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