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dc.contributor.authorFeng, Yucheng
dc.contributor.authorHartel, Peter G.
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Jared A.
dc.contributor.authorRodgers, Karen
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Bin
dc.contributor.authorRitter, Kerry J.
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-07T13:52:18Z
dc.date.available2013-07-07T13:52:18Z
dc.date.issued2007-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/48270
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 2007 Georgia Water Resources Conference, March 27-29, 2007, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractFor bacterial source tracking (BST), the percentage of Enterococcus faecalis isolates among all fecal enterococci in an environmental water sample may serve as an inexpensive indicator of human and bird fecal contamination. Research suggests that some subspecies of fecal indicator bacteria are better adapted than others to survive environmental conditions. We determined the survival of seven different Ent. faecalis subspecies, three from different wastewater treatment plants and one from a latrine (presumably all of human origin), two from birds, and the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) type strain, in two freshwater creek sediments, Saugahatchee Creek in Alabama and Tanyard Creek in Georgia. Ribotyping was used to identify different subspecies. Survival was determined in modified sentinel chambers (Microfilterfuge™ tubes sealed at both ends with ≤0.45 µm membranes). Each Enterococcus ribotype was inoculated into sentinel chambers at approximately 105-6bacteria per g dry weight of sediment, and the Most Probable Number (MPN) was estimated at Days 0 and 11. The MPNs of the seven Ent. faecalis subspecies declined 62.4 to 95.2 % in Alabama sediment; MPNs of the same subspecies declined 95.4 to 99.6% in Georgia sediment. There was no positive correlation among the subspecies that survived better in Alabama sediment and those that survived better in Georgia sediment. Statistical analyses suggest that not only did differences in survival exist among subspecies of Ent. faecalis, but also that differences existed between locations. However, in terms of BST, the rapid decreases in MPNs suggested that any subspecies adaptation to environmental conditions was minor.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Natural Resources Conservation Service, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by the Institute of Ecology, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2202. The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of The University of Georgia, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Resources Research Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-397) or the other conference sponsors.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI2007. Poster Presentationsen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectBacterial source trackingen_US
dc.subjectFreshwater creek sedimentsen_US
dc.subjectWater contaminationen_US
dc.subjectSubspecies adaptationen_US
dc.titleDifferences in Survival Among Enterococcus Faecalis Subspecies in Two Freshwater Creek Sedimentsen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameAuburn University. Agronomy and Soils Dept.en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Georgia. Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameSouthern California Coastal Water Research Projecten_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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