Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRegan, Jeffrey
dc.contributor.authorGeorgakakos, Aristidis Peter
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-23T13:12:29Z
dc.date.available2013-07-23T13:12:29Z
dc.date.issued2013-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/48520
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 2013 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 10-11, 2013, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractIndications of a climatic change on a global scale are increasingly calling into question what we know about and what to expect from our own local climates. A changing climate means the traditional method of using historical hydro-climatic conditions as expected conditions in water planning and management may be unwise. New methods for determining and characterizing expected local hydro-climatic conditions should consider an evaluation of how historical local hydro-climatic conditions have changed over time. In this sense, an evaluation of hydro-climatic trends in the Southeastern US has been developed using historical records from weather gages. Trends for monthly precipitation, maximum and minimum temperatures, evaporation, and stream flow have been developed for various historic time intervals during 1909 to 2009. The historic hydro-climatic trends have been plotted and mapped in a manner to easily show seasonal and regional shifts that have occurred in the past 50 and 100 years. These trends vary by season and location, and there are few trends that appear to be region-wide and no trends that appear year-round. In the past 100 years the annual temperature records region-wide indicate a cooling trend strongest during winter and fall and weakest during summer months. However 50-year trends indicate a warming trend in almost all months region-wide. The 100-year trends of precipitation indicate an increase in annual precipitation in most areas, however, a decrease during the driest summer months. The 50-year trends indicate a decrease in annual precipitation and increased evaporation in almost all regions. Identification and illustration of these trends is an important step in debunking the traditional notion that “what was, will be” and moving towards a non-stationary hydro-climatic approach to water planning and management.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored by: Georgia Environmental Protection Division; U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service; Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Water Resources Institute; The University of Georgia, Water Resources Faculty.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2152. The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of The University of Georgia, the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Research Institutes Authorization Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-307) or the other conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI2013. Climate, Floods, & Droughtsen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectHydro-climatic trendsen_US
dc.subjectAnnual precipitationen_US
dc.subjectIncreased evaporationen_US
dc.subjectWater planningen_US
dc.titleHydro-Climatic Trends in the Southeastern USen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Water Resources Instituteen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia. Environmental Protection Divisionen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record