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dc.contributor.authorMiller, Mark Brian
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-23T23:25:37Z
dc.date.available2013-07-23T23:25:37Z
dc.date.issued2013-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/48537
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 2013 Georgia Water Resources Conference, April 10-11, 2013, Athens, Georgia.en_US
dc.description.abstractSelecting the proper stormwater treatment technology presents a number of challenges to site designers, regulatory agencies and other stakeholders alike. It is paramount for stormwater Best Management Practice (BMP) technologies to be specified in accordance with the intended land use as well as conditions for which those technologies are designed to operate. Furthermore, the ever increasing demand to implement green infrastructure designs that rely on Low Impact Development (LID) practices presents a wide variety of challenges to the stormwater community. An LID technology selection pyramid illustrates a process to identify proper stormwater technologies including both land based and manufactured devices. An integrated technologies approach to LID practices offers the opportunity to uniquely utilize a number of treatment train options to enhance BMP performance and sustainability. The LID technology selection process also often fails to adequately address site characteristics in context with the performance capabilities of the treatment approach. For example, the performance of hydrodynamic separators decreases as particle size decreases. If fine silt is the dominant particulate in the stormwater runoff, then filtration would be more effective in that case. Improper use of a treatment technology can lead to poor performance and inaccurate conclusions regarding the performance capabilities of the device and technology as a whole. Several factors to consider for selecting treatment technologies include future land use, type and pollutant concentrations, particle size, design storm, footprint, installation cost, maintenance costs, practicality, and long term functionality.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSponsored by: Georgia Environmental Protection Division; U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service; Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Water Resources Institute; The University of Georgia, Water Resources Faculty.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityThis book was published by Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2152. The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of The University of Georgia, the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Research Institutes Authorization Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-307) or the other conference sponsors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGWRI2013. Groundwater, water management and dataen_US
dc.subjectWater resources managementen_US
dc.subjectStormwater treatmenten_US
dc.titleImplementing an integrated technologies approach to low impact development designsen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameAquaShield, Inc.en_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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