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dc.contributor.authorBest, Michael L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSmyth, Thomas N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEtherton, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorWornyo, Edemen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-24T14:45:18Z
dc.date.available2013-07-24T14:45:18Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationBest, M. L., Etherton, J., Smyth, T., & Wornyo, E. (2010). Uses of Mobile Phones in Post-Conflict Liberia. Information Technologies and International Development, 6(2).en_US
dc.identifier.issn1544-7529
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/48541
dc.description© 2010 USC Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism. Published under Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. All rights not granted thereunder to the public are reserved to the publisher and may not be exercised without its express written permission.en_US
dc.description.abstractLiberia is a country emerging from years of protracted and devastating civil conflict. Left without any fixed-line telephone infrastructure, it relies solely on the mobile phone for telephony. This study investigates the usage of mobile phones in this immediate post-conflict setting. In particular, we adopt the uses and gratifications approach to media research, giving focus to both instrumental and intrinsic motivations for use. We surveyed 85 mobile phone users in both the capital city of Monrovia and various rural areas, as well as interviewing experts from two major service providers and the industry regulator. Users were interviewed using the Q methodology, which identified distinct perspectives within these urban and rural groups. These identified perspectives included sets of users who saw their phones as productivity enhancers, means of connectivity to family and friends, essential business tools, technological curiosities, and sources of personal security. The idea of a phone as a stylish object was markedly rejected, especially in rural areas. Expert interviews confirmed and supplemented these findings. We contrast these results from Liberia with previous work from Kigali, Rwanda, finding differences especially as related to security.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectMobile phonesen_US
dc.subjectLiberiaen_US
dc.subjectPost-conflicten_US
dc.subjectRwandaen_US
dc.subjectMobile toolsen_US
dc.titleUses of Mobile Phones in Post-Conflict Liberiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of International Affairsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Interactive Computingen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameIBM Microelectronics. Systems and Technology Groupen_US
dc.publisher.originalUniversity of Southern California, Annenberg School for Communication & Journalismen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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