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dc.contributor.authorChen, Tiffany L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCiocarlie, Mateien_US
dc.contributor.authorCousins, Steveen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrice, Phillip M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHawkins, Kelseyen_US
dc.contributor.authorHsiao, Kaijenen_US
dc.contributor.authorKemp, Charles C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKing, Chih-Hungen_US
dc.contributor.authorLazewatsky, Daniel A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Haien_US
dc.contributor.authorPaepcke, Andreasen_US
dc.contributor.authorPantofaru, Carolineen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmart, William D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTakayama, Leilaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-18T21:36:28Z
dc.date.available2013-12-18T21:36:28Z
dc.date.issued2013-03
dc.identifier.citationRobots for Humanity: Using Assistive Robotics to Empower People with Disabilities, Tiffany L. Chen, Matei Ciocarlie, Steve Cousins, Phillip Grice, Kelsey Hawkins, Kaijen Hsiao, Charles C. Kemp, Chih-Hung King, Daniel A. Lazewatsky, Adam Leeper, Hai Nguyen, Andreas Paepcke, Caroline Pantofaru, William D. Smart, and Leila Takayama, IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine, vol.20, no.1, pp.30,39, March 2013.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1070-9932
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/49845
dc.description©2013 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other users, including reprinting/ republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted components of this work in other works.en_US
dc.descriptionDOI: 10.1109/MRA.2012.2229950en_US
dc.description.abstractAssistive mobile manipulators have the potential to one day serve as surrogates and helpers for people with disabilities, giving them the freedom to perform tasks such as scratching an itch, picking up a cup, or socializing with their families. This article introduces a collaborative project with the goal of putting assistive mobile manipulators into real homes to work with people with disabilities. Through a participatory design process in which users have been actively involved from day one, we are identifying and developing assistive capabilities for the PR2 robot. Our approach is to develop a diverse suite of open source software tools that blend the capabilities of the user and the robot. Within this article, we introduce the project, describe our progress, and discuss lessons we have learned.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectAssistive robot technologyen_US
dc.subjectAssistive mobile manipulatorsen_US
dc.subjectAAMen_US
dc.subjectDisabled peopleen_US
dc.titleRobots for Humanity: A Case Study in Assistive Mobile Manipulationen_US
dc.title.alternativeRobots for Humanity: Using Assistive Robotics to Empower People with Disabilitiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.typePost-printen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Healthcare Robotics Laben_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machinesen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameOregon State University. School of Mechanical, Industrial,and Manufacturing Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameWillow Garage, Inc.en_US
dc.publisher.originalInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineersen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/MRA.2012.2229950


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