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dc.contributor.advisorDurgin, Gregory D.
dc.contributor.authorMorys, Marcin M.
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-13T16:48:17Z
dc.date.available2014-01-13T16:48:17Z
dc.date.created2013-12
dc.date.issued2013-11-07
dc.date.submittedDecember 2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/50324
dc.description.abstractIn order to improve efficiency and reliability of the world's power grids, sensors are being deployed for constant status monitoring. Placing inexpensive wireless sensors on high-voltage power lines presents a new challenge to the RF engineer. Large electric field intensities can exist around a wireless sensor antenna on a high-voltage power line, leading to the formation of a corona plasma. A corona plasma is a partially ionized volume of air formed through energetic electron-molecule collisions mediated by a strong electric field. This corona can contain large densities of free electrons which act as a conducting medium, absorbing RF energy and detuning the sensor's antenna. Through the use of low-profile antennas and rounded geometries, the possibility for corona formation on the antenna surface is greatly reduced, as compared with wire antennas. This study looks at the effects of a corona plasma on a patch antenna, which could be used in a power line sensor. The corona's behavior in the presence of an electromagnetic plane wave is analyzed mathematically to understand the dependence of attenuation on frequency and electron density. A Drude model is used to convert plasma parameters such as electron density and collision frequency to a complex permittivity that can be incorporated in antenna simulations. Using CST Microwave Studio, a 5.8 GHz patch antenna is simulated with a plasma material on its surface, of varying densities and thicknesses. Power absorption by the plasma dominates the power loss, as opposed to detuning. A wideband patch is simulated to show that the detuning effects by the plasma can be further reduced. Power absorption by the plasma is significant for electron densities greater than 10¹⁸ m⁻³. However, small point corona are found to have little effect on antenna radiation.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technology
dc.subjectPatch antenna
dc.subjectCorona
dc.subjectPlasma
dc.subjectHigh-voltage
dc.subject.lcshWireless sensor networks
dc.subject.lcshElectric lines Monitoring
dc.subject.lcshCorona (Electricity)
dc.subject.lcshAntennas (Electronics)
dc.titlePatch antenna characterization in a high-voltage corona plasma
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeM.S.
dc.contributor.departmentElectrical and Computer Engineering
thesis.degree.levelMasters
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPeterson, Andrew F.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSteffes, Paul G.
dc.date.updated2014-01-13T16:48:17Z


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