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dc.contributor.authorMassof, Robert W.
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-14T16:33:44Z
dc.date.available2014-01-14T16:33:44Z
dc.date.issued2003-07
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the 9th International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD2003), Boston, MA, July 7-9, 2003. Eds. Eoin Brazil and Barbara Shinn-Cunningham. International Community for Auditory Display, 2003.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/50436
dc.descriptionProceedings of the 9th International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD), Boston, MA, July 7-9, 2003.en_US
dc.description.abstractMost auditory assistive devices for the Blind employ synthetic speech. These include talking computer interfaces, reading machines, talking signs, and a plethora of talking appliances and gadgets. Some devices use warning tones to signal events or localize objects. Sonification in assistive devices is limited to wayfinding systems that encode range into frequency. There are now some prototype systems that offer more complex sonifications for wayfinding and interpreting images. There still are no assistive devices that use both 3D sound and sonification to augment the auditory environment.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectAuditory displayen_US
dc.subjectAuditory assisten_US
dc.titleAuditory assistive devices for the blinden_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameJohns Hopkins University. School of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameWilmer Ophthalmological Institute
dc.publisher.originalInternational Community on Auditory Displayen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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