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dc.contributor.authorWalker, Ashley
dc.contributor.authorBrewster, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-16T01:13:50Z
dc.date.available2014-01-16T01:13:50Z
dc.date.issued2001-07
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the 7th International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD2001), Espoo, Finland, July 29-August 1, 2001. Eds.: J. Hiipakka, N. Zacharov, and T. Takala. International Community for Auditory Display, 2001.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/50510
dc.descriptionPresented at the 7th International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD), Espoo, Finland, July 29-August 1, 2001.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this work, we look at the perception of event locality under conditions of disparate audio and visual cues. We address an aspect of the so called ``ventriloquism effect'' relevant for multimedia designers; namely, how auditory perception of event locality is influenced by the size and scale of the accompanying visual projection of those events. We observed that recalibration of the visual axes of an audio-visual animation (by resizing and zooming) exerts a recalibrating influence on the auditory space perception. In particular, sensitivity to audio-visual discrepancies (between a centrally located visual stimuli and laterally displaced audio cue) increases near the edge of the screen on which the visual cue is displayed. In other words, discrepancy detection thresholds are not fixed for a particular pair of stimuli, but are influenced by the size of the display space. Moreover, the discrepancy thresholds are influenced by scale as well as size. That is, the boundary of auditory space perception is not rigidly fixed on the boundaries of the screen; it also depends on the spatial relationship depicted. For example, the ventriloquism effect will break down within the boundaries of a large screen if zooming is used to exaggerate the proximity of the audience to the events. The latter effect appears to be much weaker than the former.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectAuditory displayen_US
dc.subjectAudio-visual locationen_US
dc.title"Sitting too close to the screen can be bad for your ears": A study of audio-visual location discrepancy detection under different visual projectionsen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Glasglow. Department of Computing Scienceen_US
dc.publisher.originalInternational Community on Auditory Displayen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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