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dc.contributor.authorCrease, Murray
dc.contributor.authorBrewster, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-29T04:25:11Z
dc.date.available2014-01-29T04:25:11Z
dc.date.issued1998-11
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the 5th International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD1998), Glasgow, UK, November 1-4, 1998. Ed.: S. Brewster. International Community for Auditory Display, 1998.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/50725
dc.descriptionPresented at 5th International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD), Glasgow, UK, November 1-4, 1998.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper describes an experiment to investigate the effectiveness of adding sound to progress bars. Progress bars have usability problems because they present temporal information graphically and if the user wants to keep abreast of this information, he/she must constantly visually scan the progress bar. The addition of sounds to a progress bar allows users to monitor the state of the progress bar without using their visual focus. Nonspeech sounds called earcons were used to indicate the current state of the task as well as the completion of the download. Results showed a significant reduction in the time taken to perform the task in the audio condition. The participants were aware of the state of the progress bar without having to remove the visual focus from their foreground task.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectAuditory displayen_US
dc.subjectSound designen_US
dc.titleMaking progress with sounds - the design & evaluation of an audio progress baren_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Glasgow. Department of Computing Scienceen_US
dc.publisher.originalInternational Community on Auditory Display
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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