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dc.contributor.authorWalsh, M.
dc.contributor.editorBrazil, Eoinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-04T19:27:44Z
dc.date.available2014-02-04T19:27:44Z
dc.date.issued2004-07
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of ICAD 04. Tenth Meeting of the International Conference on Auditory Display, Sydney, Australia, July 6-9, 2004. Ed. Barrass, S. and Vickers, P. International Community for Auditory Display, 2004.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/50831
dc.descriptionPresented at the 10th International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD2004)en_US
dc.description.abstract``If the mental objects of philosophy, art, and science have a place it will be in the deepest synaptic fissures, in the hiatuses, intervals, and mean-times of the non-objectifiable brain, in a place where to go in search of them will be to create.'' It would be fair to assume that developing the sonification of neurological data would add to our knowledge of the mind. Taking the above quote seriously, however, implies that this addition would also be a creation. This paper is concerned with the relation of scientific and artistic processes in an effort to aurally map the mind. In particular, it is concerned with the affect of this relation on the design processes needed to develop such a method. It will suggest that the mind listening to itself is productively scientific and creative.en_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectAuditory displayen_US
dc.subjectAural mapsen_US
dc.subjectNeural futureen_US
dc.subjectSonificationen_US
dc.titleAural maps, neural futuresen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameAustralian National University. The Humanities Research Centreen_US
dc.publisher.originalInternational Community for Auditory Displayen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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