Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGuillaume, A.
dc.contributor.authorDrake, C.
dc.contributor.authorBlancard, C.
dc.contributor.authorChastres, V.
dc.contributor.authorPellieux, L.
dc.contributor.editorBrazil, Eoinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-12T03:32:14Z
dc.date.available2014-02-12T03:32:14Z
dc.date.issued2004-07
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of ICAD 04. Tenth Meeting of the International Conference on Auditory Display, Sydney, Australia, July 6-9, 2004. Ed. Barrass, S. and Vickers, P. International Community for Auditory Display, 2004.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/50857
dc.descriptionPresented at the 10th International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD2004)en_US
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies of alarm design have concluded that the faster a mental representation of the cause of the alarm is activated, the quicker the adapted reaction. In order to select sounds that are quick to identify, an experiment was carried out using a gated stimulus paradigm with 117 everyday sounds. Almost half of the sounds were identified in less than 150 ms, including both classical alarms and sounds from other categories of everyday sounds. Thus it should possible to identify acoustic properties of each category of alarms within an integrated alarm system in order to improve discrimination among them.en_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectAuditory displayen_US
dc.subjectIdentifyen_US
dc.subjectSounden_US
dc.titleHow long does it take to identify everyday soundsen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameInstitut de Médecine Aérospatiale du Service de Santé des Arméesen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversité René Descartes. Laboratoire de Psychologie Expérimentaleen_US
dc.publisher.originalInternational Community for Auditory Displayen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record