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dc.contributor.authorGygi, Brian
dc.contributor.authorShafiro, Valeriy
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-19T04:11:04Z
dc.date.available2014-03-19T04:11:04Z
dc.date.issued2009-05
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the 15th International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD2009), Copenhagen, Denmark. May 18-22, 2009. Eds. Mitsuko Aramaki, Richard Kronland-Martinet, Sølvi Ystad, Kristoffer Jensen. International Community for Auditory Display, 2009.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-87-7606-033-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/51400
dc.descriptionPresented at the 15th International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD2009), Copenhagen, Denmark, May 18-22, 2009en_US
dc.description.abstractA persistent concern in the field of auditory display design has been how to effectively use environmental sounds, which are naturally occurring familiar non-speech, non-musical sounds. Environmental sounds represent physical events in the everyday world, and thus they have a semantic content that enables learning and recognition. However, unless used appropriately, their functions in auditory displays may cause problems. One of the main considerations in using environmental sounds as auditory icons is how to ensure the identifiability of the sound sources. The identifiability of an auditory icon depends on both the intrinsic acoustic properties of the sound it represents, and on the semantic fit of the sound to its context, i.e., whether the context is one in which the sound naturally occurs or would be unlikely to occur. Relatively recent research has yielded some insights into both of these factors. A second major consideration is how to use the source properties to represent events in the auditory display. This entails parameterizing the environmental sounds so the acoustics will both relate to source properties familiar to the user and convey meaningful new information to the user. Finally, particular considerations come into play when designing auditory displays for special populations, such as hearing impaired listeners who may not have access to all the acoustic information available to a normal hearing listener, or to elderly or other individuals whose cognitive resources may be diminished. Some guidelines for designing displays for these populations will be outlined.en_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectAuditory displayen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental sounden_US
dc.titleFrom signal to substance and back: Insights from environmental sound research to auditory display designen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameVeterans Affairs Northern California Health Care Systemen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameRush University Medical Center. Communications Disorders and Sciencesen_US
dc.publisher.originalInternational Community for Auditory Displayen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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