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dc.contributor.authorMorrison, James
dc.contributor.authorNewstetter, Wendy
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-02T18:09:39Z
dc.date.available2014-05-02T18:09:39Z
dc.date.issued2013-10-21
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/51697
dc.descriptionPlenary workshop presented at the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) 2013 Southern Regional Conference on October 21, 2013 from 8:00 am-10:45 am at the Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center, Atlanta, GA.en_US
dc.descriptionCONFERENCE THEME: Through the Looking Glass: Visions and Planning for the Future of Higher Education - Nothing is permanent except change; the continuous evolution of higher education is its only constant. The speed of this evolution is influenced by many drivers but as we attempt to predict what the future of higher education might look like it is evident that changes are accelerating at an unprecedented pace. From academics to campus life; from fiscal to the environmental; the future is influenced in part by changes in expectations, technologies, pedagogies and demographics. Glimpses of the future of higher education are starting to influence the way we think of and plan for our institutions now. Student, parent, legislative and market expectations are advancing performance based, result oriented decisions on every aspect of education. Technologies are driving changes in the way education is purchased, accessed, and delivered. Education and scholarship are no longer bound by location, time or cost. How do planners integrate academics, financial and physical parameters and interest when they are changing so quickly? What makes the campus of the future relevant in the age of online classes? What environmental and fiscal changes have to be made to accommodate changing models of learning?
dc.descriptionPlenary workshop presented by: James Morrison, Professor Emeritus, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Wendy Newstetter, Professor & Director of Educational Research and Innovation, Georgia Institute of Technology. Introduced by: Kathryn Horne, Master Planner, Capital Planning & Space Management, Georgia Institute of Technology-Main Campus and Howard S. Wertheimer, Director, Capital Planning & Space Management, Georgia Institute of Technology
dc.descriptionRuntime: 78:31 minutes
dc.description.abstractThe educational landscape is undergoing considerable upheaval due in large part to emerging developments in educational technology and pedagogical approaches. The rapid availability of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) from major universities within the last year or so, the emergence of competency-based degree programs and evaluation systems, flipped classrooms, mobile learning, and the shifting paradigm from lecture- based towards project and inquiry-based instruction pose challenges to college and university planners as they prepare their campuses for the future. This interactive plenary session focuses on understanding these developments and exploring their implications for campus planning.en_US
dc.format.extent78:31 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectDisruptionen_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectInnovationen_US
dc.subjectLearningen_US
dc.subjectMOOCsen_US
dc.titleDisruptive Innovations in Higher Education: Implications for the 21st Century Campusen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. College of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of City and Regional Planningen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Office of Capital Planning and Space Managementen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hillen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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