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dc.contributor.advisorAdibi, Ali
dc.contributor.authorAlipour Motaallem, Seyed Payam
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-22T15:20:59Z
dc.date.available2014-05-22T15:20:59Z
dc.date.created2014-05
dc.date.issued2014-01-08
dc.date.submittedMay 2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/51792
dc.description.abstractIntegrated optics as a platform for signal processing offers significant benefits such as large bandwidth, low loss, and a potentially high degree of reconfigurability. Silicon (Si) has unique advantages as a material platform for integration, as well as properties such as a strong thermo-optic mechanism that allows for the realization of highly reconfigurable photonic systems. Chapter 1 is devoted to the discussion of these advantages, and Chapter 2 provides the theoretical background for the analysis of integrated Si-photonic devices. The thermo-optic property of Si, while proving extremely useful in facilitating reconfiguration, can turn into a nuisance when there is a need for thermally stable devices on the photonic chip. Chapter 3 presents a technique for resolving this issue without relying on a dynamic temperature stabilization process. Temperature-insensitive (or “athermal”) Si microdisk resonators with low optical loss are realized by using a polymer overlayer whose thermo-optic property is opposite to that of Si, and TiO2 is introduced as an alternative to polymer to deal with potential CMOS-compatibility issues. Chapter 4 demonstrates an ultra-compact, low-loss, fully reconfigurable, and high-finesse integrated photonic filter implemented on a Si chip, which can be used for RF-photonic as well as purely optical signal processing purposes. A novel, thermally reconfigurable reflection suppressor is presented in Chapter 5 for on-chip feedback elimination which can be critical for mitigating spurious interferences and protecting lasers from disturbance. Chapter 6 demonstrates a novel device for on-chip control of optical fiber polarization. Chapter 7 deals with select issues in the implementation of Si integrated photonic circuits. Chapter 8 concludes the dissertation.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technology
dc.subjectIntegrated optics
dc.subjectSilicon photonics
dc.subjectAthermal
dc.subjectReconfigurable
dc.subject.lcshPhotonics
dc.subject.lcshIntegrated optics
dc.subject.lcshAdaptive computing systems
dc.subject.lcshSilicon
dc.titleReconfigurable integrated photonic circuits on silicon
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.contributor.departmentElectrical and Computer Engineering
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
dc.contributor.committeeMemberRalph, Stephen E.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBuck, John A.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberChang, Gee-Kung
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPerry, Joseph W.
dc.date.updated2014-05-22T15:20:59Z


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