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dc.contributor.advisorBeckham, Haskell W.
dc.contributor.authorPark, Doh-Yeon
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-27T13:32:12Z
dc.date.available2014-08-28T05:30:05Z
dc.date.created2013-08
dc.date.issued2013-07-02
dc.date.submittedAugust 2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/52172
dc.description.abstractAnion exchange membrane fuel cells (AEMFCs) are an alternative to proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) with potential benefits that include low cost (i.e., platinum-free), facile electro-kinetics, low fuel crossover, and use of CO-resistant metal catalysts. Despite these advantages, AEMFCs have not been widely used because they require more highly conductive anion exchange membranes (AEMs) that do not exhibit impaired physical properties. Therefore, the issues that this research is dealing with are to maximize conductivity and to improve chemical stability. As model materials for these studies, I synthesize a series of multiblock copolymers with which polymer structures and morphologies can be easily controlled. Chapter 2 presents the synthesis and the chemical structure determination of the multiblock copolymers. With the objective of maximizing conductivity, an understanding of the impact of structural features such as organization, size, polarity and connectivity of ionic domains and channels within AEMs on ion/water transporting properties is necessary for the targeted and predictable design of an enhanced material. Chapters 3 to 5 describe three characterization techniques that reveal the role of these structural features in the transport process. Specifically, Chapter 3 demonstrates the possibility that the NMR relaxation times of water could be an indicator of the efficiency of ion channels. Low-temperature DSC measurements differentiate the state of water (i.e., bound water and free water) inside the membranes by measuring freezing temperature drop and enthalpy. Chapter 4 demonstrates that the number of water molecules in each state correlates with conductivity and suggests a major anion-conducting mechanism for the multiblock AEM systems. In Chapter 5, the measurement of the activation energy of diffusion characterizes ion transporting behavior that occurs on the sub-nanometer scale. For the characterization of the chemical stability of the AEMs under high pH conditions, I employ automated 1H NMR measurements as a function of time as well as diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy (DOSY) as shown in Chapter 6. Finally, I demonstrate that new multiblock copolymers are successfully utilized as an ionomer for a hybrid cell in Chapter 7. The properties of the polymer strongly influence overall cell performance. I believe that the combination of the techniques presented in this thesis will provide insight into the ion/water transporting mechanism in a polymer ion conductor and guidance for improving conductivity and the chemical stability of the AEMs.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technology
dc.subjectAnion exchange membrane
dc.subjectNMR
dc.subjectDSC
dc.subjectChemical stability
dc.subjectFuel cell
dc.titleAnion-conductive multiblock aromatic copolymer membranes: structure-property relationships
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.contributor.departmentMaterials Science and Engineering
dc.embargo.terms2014-08-01
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKohl, Paul A.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGriffin, Anselm C.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBucknall, David G.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberJang, Seung Soon
dc.date.updated2014-08-27T13:32:12Z


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