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dc.contributor.authorKrovi, Venkat N.
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-15T18:06:02Z
dc.date.available2014-10-15T18:06:02Z
dc.date.issued2014-10-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/52649
dc.descriptionVenkat N. Krovi is an associate professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo, with adjunct appointments in Electrical Engineering, Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, and Gynecology-Obstetrics. In September 2001, Krovi joined the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at the State University of New York at Buffalo as a tenure-track assistant professor and received tenure in June 2007. At Buffalo, Krovi directs the Automation, Robotics and Mechatronics (ARM) Lab and the Computer Integrated Surgery (CIS) Lab. His research program focuses on lifecycle treatment (design, modeling, analysis, control, implementation, and verification) of novel mechanical and mechatronic systems with emphasis on both the theoretical formulation and experimental validation. The rich theory of kinematics, dynamics, and control of constrained articulated mechanical systems forms the intellectual basis of his research.en_US
dc.descriptionPresented on October 8, 2014 from 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm in the Marcus Nanotechnology Building, room 1116.
dc.descriptionRuntime: 55:49 minutes
dc.description.abstractSurgical procedural performance involves interplay of a highly dynamic system of intercoupled perceptual, sensory, and cognitive components—at the current stage, however, our focus is on sensorimotor procedural performance. Our operant hypothesis is that while human manipulation behavior may be based on the dynamic interaction between the neuromuscular system and its dynamic environment (human-machine interface + task dynamics), it becomes manifest in the ensuing spatiotemporal patterns. Hence, we take a sensing/systems perspective and propose to track, measure and record, under carefully controlled conditions, low-level dynamic behaviors of users (novitiates to experts) as they perform skilled surgical tasks. Our immediate goal is to then determine the underlying structure (“skill-level” or “signature”) of a proceduralist, with its clear ramifications to accreditation and certification, despite the significant spatiotemporal variability of populations (human), coupling characteristics (device), and the interactions (environment). We will present early results from our skill assessment implementation efforts in two contexts: (A) The da Vinci Robotic Minimally Invasive Surgery (RMIS) case that involves multi-degree-of-freedom dexterous motion components, features better instrumentation and sensing, but is currently performed without haptic feedback; and (B) Percutaneous Kidney Biopsy case that initially is more unstructured and open-ended but ultimately has more-constrained (1 DOF) motions, yet depends critically on the sense of touch.en_US
dc.format.extent00:00 minutes
dc.format.extent55:49 minutes
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIRIM Seminar Seriesen_US
dc.subjectQuantitative assessmenten_US
dc.subjectRobotic surgeryen_US
dc.titleQuantitative System for Technical Assessment and Training of Skills (STATS) for Surgical Performanceen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machineen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameState University of New York at Buffaloen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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  • IRIM Seminar Series [93]
    Each semester a core seminar series is announced featuring guest speakers from around the world and from varying backgrounds in robotics.

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