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dc.contributor.authorGoldman, Daniel I.
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-23T20:46:20Z
dc.date.available2014-10-23T20:46:20Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationGoldman, D. I. (2014). Colloquium: Biophysical principles of undulatory self-propulsion in granular media. Reviews of Modern Physics, 86(3), 12.© 2014 by The American Physical Society.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0034-6861
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/52725
dc.description© 2014 The American Physical Societyen_US
dc.descriptionDOI: 10.1103/RevModPhys.86.943
dc.description.abstractBiological locomotion, movement within environments through self-deformation, encompasses a range of time and length scales in an organism. These include the electrophysiology of the nervous system, the dynamics of muscle activation, the mechanics of the skeletal system, and the interaction mechanics of such structures within natural environments like water, air, sand, and mud. Unlike the many studies of cellular and molecular scale biophysical processes, movement of entire organisms (like flies, lizards, and snakes) is less explored. Further, while movement in fluids like air and water is also well studied, little is known in detail of the mechanics that organisms use to move on and within flowable terrestrial materials such as granular media, ensembles of small particles that collectively display solid, fluid, and gaslike behaviors. This Colloquium reviews recent progress to understand principles of biomechanics and granular physics responsible for locomotion of the sandfish, a small desert-dwelling lizard that “ swims” within sand using undulation of its body. Kinematic and muscle activity measurements of sand swimming using high speed x-ray imaging and electromyography are discussed. This locomotion problem poses an interesting challenge: namely, that equations that govern the interaction of the lizard with its environment do not yet exist. Therefore, complementary modeling approaches are also described: resistive force theory for granular media, multiparticle simulation modeling, and robotic physical modeling. The models reproduce biomechanical and neuromechanical aspects of sand swimming and give insight into how effective locomotion arises from the coupling of the body movement and flow of the granular medium. The argument is given that biophysical study of movement provides exciting opportunities to investigate emergent aspects of living systems that might not depend sensitively on biological details.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectBiological locomotionen_US
dc.subjectBiomechanicsen_US
dc.subjectGranular mediumen_US
dc.subjectMultiparticle simulation modelingen_US
dc.subjectNatural environmentsen_US
dc.subjectNeuromechanicalen_US
dc.subjectOrganismen_US
dc.subjectRobotic physical modelingen_US
dc.subjectSelf-deformationen_US
dc.titleColloquium: Biophysical principles of undulatory self-propulsion in granular mediaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Physicsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines
dc.identifier.doi10.1103/RevModPhys.86.943
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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