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dc.contributor.authorKroenig, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-06T16:18:57Z
dc.date.available2014-11-06T16:18:57Z
dc.date.issued2014-10-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/52798
dc.descriptionMatthew Kroenig is an Associate Professor and International Relations Field Chair in the Department of Government at Georgetown University and a Nonresident Senior Fellow in the Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security at The Atlantic Council. He is an expert on U.S. national security policy and strategy, international relations theory, nuclear deterrence, arms control, nuclear nonproliferation, Iran, and counterterrorism.en_US
dc.descriptionPresented on October 21, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. in the Klaus Computing Building, room 1116.
dc.descriptionRuntime: 68:55 minutes
dc.description.abstractMatthew Kroenig discusses the security implications of a nuclear-armed Iran. While making it clear that he does not advocate war, he claims that all signs point to the Islamic Republic’s interest in the bomb and that time is rapidly elapsing for an effective negotiated or even credible preemptive strike. He argues that on balance the “costs” and challenges of a preemptive strike would prove to be less than those associated with attempting to contain a nuclear armed Iran. The latter scenario, for example, would further destabilize the Middle East, encourage arms racing, and significantly increase the odds of a regional nuclear conflict. Given these high stakes, Kroenig advocates that U.S. policymakers keep the option of preemptive military strike against Iran’s nuclear infrastructure on the table.
dc.format.extent68:55 minutes
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCISTP Lectureen_US
dc.subjectArms controlen_US
dc.subjectCounterterrorismen_US
dc.subjectInternational relationsen_US
dc.subjectIranen_US
dc.subjectNational security policyen_US
dc.subjectNuclear deterrenceen_US
dc.titleAll Options on the Tableen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of International Affairsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgetown University. Dept. of Govermenten_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameAtlantic Councilen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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  • CISTP Lecture Series [36]
    A series of lectures that integrate technology and the study of international affairs

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