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dc.contributor.authorBriggle, Adam
dc.contributor.authorHolbrook, J. Britt
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-13T20:10:34Z
dc.date.available2014-11-13T20:10:34Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationBriggle, Adam and Holbrook, J. Britt. "Games." Ethics, Science, Technology, and Engineering, 2nd Ed. J. Britt Holbrook, Editor. Macmillan Reference USA, 2015. Page(s) 331-333. Print.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9780028662138
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/52815
dc.descriptionCopyright © 2014 Cengage Learningen_US
dc.description.abstractThe long history of humans playing games to amuse or challenge themselves has been fundamentally transformed by science and technology. Science has studied in detail how games work, and technology has created whole new forms of computer and video games. Computer and video games exhibit two types of relationships to ethics: one concerns the ethics of the games themselves, another the possibility of using games to teach ethics.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the US National Science Foundation under Grants No. 1252692 & 1338739. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation (NSF).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectGamesen_US
dc.subjectEthicsen_US
dc.titleGamesen_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Public Policyen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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