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dc.contributor.authorHolbrook, J. Britt
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T19:35:14Z
dc.date.available2014-11-17T19:35:14Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationHolbrook, J. Britt. "United States National Science Foundation, Broader Impacts Merit Review Criterion." Ethics, Science, Technology, and Engineering, 2nd Ed. J. Britt Holbrook, Editor. Macmillan Reference USA, 2015. Page(s) 464-467.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9780028662138
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/52822
dc.descriptionCopyright © 2014 Cengage Learningen_US
dc.description.abstractIn the early twenty-first century, science finds itself caught in a dilemma that is arguably of its own making: its very success in terms of understanding and controlling nature means that it has given birth to powers that transcend the traditional boundaries between science and society. Rather than being viewed as essentially neutral in terms of values, society increasingly views scientific knowledge as leading to various types of winners and losers. The review criteria for US National Science Foundation (NSF) proposals offer an instructive case study of this increasingly prominent dynamic.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the US National Science Foundation under Grants No. 0649573 & 0830387. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation (NSF).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectNational Science Foundation (NSF)en_US
dc.subjectScience impacten_US
dc.titleUnited States National Science Foundation, Broader Impacts Merit Review Criterionen_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Public Policyen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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