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dc.contributor.authorXu, Xao
dc.contributor.authorArson, Chloé
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-09T13:19:08Z
dc.date.available2015-01-09T13:19:08Z
dc.date.issued2015-01
dc.identifier.citationH. Xu, C. Arson. 2015. "Mechanistic Analysis of Rock Damage Anisotropy and Rotation Around Circular Cavities". Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering . DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00603-014-0707-5en_US
dc.identifier.issn0723-2632
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/52895
dc.descriptionCopyright © 2015 Springer Vienna
dc.descriptionDOI: 10.1007/s00603-014-0707-5
dc.description.abstractWe used the differential stress-induced damage (DSID) model to predict anisotropic crack propagation under tensile and shear stress. The damage variable is similar to a crack density tensor. The damage function and the damage potential are expressed as functions of the energy release rate, defined as the thermodynamic force that is work-conjugate to damage. Contrary to the previous damage models, flow rules are obtained by deriving dissipation functions by the energy release rate, and thermodynamic consistency is ensured. The damage criterion is adapted from the Drucker–Prager yield function. Simulations of biaxial stress tests showed that: (1) three-dimensional states of damage can be obtained for three-dimensional states of stress; (2) no damage propagates under isotropic compression; (3) crack planes propagate in the direction parallel to major compression stress; (4) damage propagation hardens the material; (5) stiffness and deformation anisotropy result from the anisotropy of damage. There is no one-to-one relationship between stress and damage. We demonstrated the effect of the loading sequence in a two-step simulation (a shear loading phase and a compression loading phase): the current state of stress and damage can be used to track the effect of stress history on damage rotation. We finally conducted a sensitivity analysis with the finite element method, to explore the stress conditions in which damage is expected to rotate around a circular cavity subject to pressurization or depressurization. Simulation results showed that: (1) before damage initiation, the DSID model matches the analytical solution of stress distribution obtained with the theory of elasticity; (2) the DSID model can predict the extent of the tensile damage zone at the crown, and that of the compressive damage zone at the sidewalls; (3) damage generated during a vertical far-field compression followed by a depressurization of the cavity is more intense than that generated during a depressurization of the cavity followed by a vertical far-field compression.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectRock mechanicsen_US
dc.subjectContinuum damage mechanicsen_US
dc.subjectThermodynamicsen_US
dc.subjectFinite element methoden_US
dc.subjectDamage rotationen_US
dc.subjectAnisotropyen_US
dc.subjectCircular cavityen_US
dc.titleMechanistic Analysis of Rock Damage Anisotropy and Rotation Around Circular Cavitiesen_US
dc.typePost-printen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Civil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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