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dc.contributor.authorBorenstein, Jason
dc.contributor.authorArkin, Ron
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-06T20:04:58Z
dc.date.available2015-03-06T20:04:58Z
dc.date.issued2015-03
dc.identifier.citationBorenstein, Jason and Ron Arkin. "Robotic Nudges: The Ethics of Engineering a More Socially Just Human Being." Science and Engineering Ethics (2015). DOI:10.1007/s11948-015-9636-2en_US
dc.identifier.issn1471-5546
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/53208
dc.descriptionCopyright © 2015 Springer-Verlag
dc.description.abstractThe time is nearing when robots are going to become a pervasive feature of our personal lives. They are already continuously operating in industrial, domestic, and military sectors. But a facet of their operation that has not quite reached its full potential is their involvement in our day-to-day routines as servants, caregivers, companions, and perhaps friends. It is clear that the multiple forms of robots already in existence and in the process of being designed will have a profound impact on human life. In fact, the motivation for their creation is largely shaped by their ability to do so. Encouraging patients to take medications, enabling children to socialize, and protecting the elderly from hazards within a living space is only a small sampling of how they could interact with humans. Their seemingly boundless potential stems in part from the possibility of their omnipresence but also because they can be physically instantiated, i.e., they are embodied in the real world, unlike many other devices. The extent of a robot’s influence on our lives hinges in large part on which design pathway the robot’s creator decides to pursue . The principal focus of this article is to generate discussion about the ethical acceptability of allowing designers to construct companion robots that nudge a user in a particular behavioral direction (and if so, under which circumstances). More specifically, we will delineate key issues related to the ethics of designing robots whose deliberate purpose is to nudge human users towards displaying greater concern for their fellow human beings, including by becoming more socially just. Important facets of this discussion include whether a robot’s “nudging ” behavior should occur with or without the user’s awareness and how much control the user should exert over it.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectAutonomyen_US
dc.subjectDesign ethicsen_US
dc.subjectNudgesen_US
dc.subjectPaternalismen_US
dc.subjectRobot ethicsen_US
dc.subjectRobot companionsen_US
dc.subjectRawlsen_US
dc.subjectSocial justiceen_US
dc.titleRobotic Nudges: The Ethics of Engineering a More Socially Just Human Beingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Public Policyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. College of Computingen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Interactive Computingen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11948-015-9636-2
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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  • Mobile Robot Laboratory [187]
    Papers, pre/post-prints, and presentations by faculty and students in the Georgia Tech Mobile Robot Laboratory.
  • Mobile Robot Laboratory Publications [187]
    Papers, pre/post-prints, and presentations by faculty and students in the Georgia Tech Mobile Robot Laboratory.

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