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dc.contributor.authorSolomon, Tom
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-23T16:29:47Z
dc.date.available2015-04-23T16:29:47Z
dc.date.issued2015-04-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/53311
dc.descriptionPresented on April 15, 2015 at 7:00 p.m. in the Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons in room 144.en_US
dc.descriptionTom Solomon is a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Bucknell University. His research interests include chaos, turbulence and pattern formation.
dc.descriptionRuntime: 54:19 minutes
dc.description.abstractIn the 17th Century, there was a profound scientific revolution, as first Galileo and then Isaac Newton overturned the commonly-accepted Aristotelian principles and replaced them with what we now call the laws of “Classical Physics.” The success of Newton’s Laws was so overwhelming that it led to an explosion of scientific research and engineering that changed society in a fundamental way. But why is it that Newton’s results were so successful? What can we learn from classical laws of physics, or from any scientific law? What can scientific principles tell us about the future? And how is it that we really know anything about the universe around us? In this talk, we will briefly review the history of scientific thought and then – through an interactive, audience-participation challenge – discuss the philosophy of David Hume, a skeptic from the early 18th Century whose philosophical theories cast doubt on the rational basis for all of scientific inquiry.en_US
dc.format.extent54:19 minutes
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPhysics Public Lecture Seriesen_US
dc.subjectInductionen_US
dc.subjectNewton's lawsen_US
dc.subjectScientific reasoningen_US
dc.titleUsing Science to Predict the Future: An Interactive Discussion of Induction and Scientific Reasoningen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Physicsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameBucknell University. Dept of Physics and Astronomyen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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