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dc.contributor.authorIngram, Carlton W.
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-28T19:27:34Z
dc.date.available2015-08-28T19:27:34Z
dc.date.issued2015-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/53786
dc.description.abstractAcross America a handful of cities have begun experimenting with an uncommon method for fostering new ridership and economic development adjacent to their heavy rail routes. Infill stations provide municipalities the chance to adapt their public transit infrastructure to a changing urban landscape in addition to increasing their tax base. The Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) commissioned an infill station study in 2007 but is yet to act on any significant recommendations. Since the study, Atlanta’s BeltLine has grown tremendously both in physical size as well as its popularity and influence. The BeltLine’s Eastside Trail crosses MARTA at Hulsey Yard, one of many potential infill station locations. Using the case study of what is perhaps the most well-known infill station, D.C.’s NoMa-Gaullaudet U station, this paper attempts to determine the potential for an infill station along MARTA’s eastern line at Hulsey Yard while considering political and fiscal realities regarding the state of Georgia and MARTA. This paper finds Hulsey Yard to be a sufficient location for an infill station, now more so than ever before, but also acknowledges the severe limitations MARTA faces in terms of transit-friendly resources.en_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectMetropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA)en_US
dc.subjectInfill stationsen_US
dc.titleAn Infill Station in Atlanta: Evaluating a MARTA rail stop at Hulsey Yarden_US
dc.typeMasters Projecten_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of City and Regional Planningen_US
dc.description.advisorWelch, Timothy F.en_US


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