Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEnglish, Brittney A.
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Ayanna M.
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-01T17:37:54Z
dc.date.available2015-09-01T17:37:54Z
dc.date.issued2014-09
dc.identifier.citationEnglish, B.A. & Howard, A.M. (2014). "Engagement study of an integrated rehabilitation robotic tablet-based gaming system". 2014 IEEE Workshop on Advanced Robotics and its Social Impacts (ARSO 2014), 11-13 Sept. 2014, pp.14-19.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/53796
dc.description© 2014 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other users, including reprinting/ republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted components of this work in other works.en_US
dc.description2014 IEEE Workshop on Advanced Robotics and its Social Impacts (ARSO), 11-13 September 2014. Evanston, IL.
dc.descriptionDOI: 10.1109/ARSO.2014.7020973
dc.description.abstractPhysical therapy is a common treatment for the rehabilitation of hemiparesis, or the weakness of one side of the body. However, a significant issue in the therapy process is that patients may struggle with motivation to complete the required therapy sessions. For this purpose, a rehabilitation gaming system was created that combines a hand rehabilitation robot with a gaming application on a tablet to promote engagement and discourage boredom. A study was also conducted to compare engagement between the gaming system and traditional therapeutic exercises. The results of this study show that participants prefer playing rehabilitation games more than they do exercising with traditional rehabilitation methods. On average, participants spent approximately four times longer playing the rehabilitation game before becoming bored than they did with traditional exercises. From their responses to the retrospective survey, the participants experienced significantly more enjoyment and engagement when exercising with the tablet game. They also experienced significantly less boredom. The participants unanimously agreed that if they were required to exercise their wrists for an hour a day, as is a normal requirement for patients in stroke therapy, that they would prefer to do so by playing the tablet game.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectGaming systemen_US
dc.subjectHand rehabilitationen_US
dc.subjectHemiparesisen_US
dc.subjectHuman-robot interactionen_US
dc.subjectPhysical therapyen_US
dc.subjectRobots
dc.subjectStroke therapy
dc.titleEngagement Study of an Integrated Rehabilitation Robotic Tablet-Based Gaming Systemen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machinesen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Electrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Human-Automation Systems Laben_US
dc.publisher.originalInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/ARSO.2014.7020973
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record