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dc.contributor.authorFisher, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-06T21:11:16Z
dc.date.available2015-10-06T21:11:16Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/54082
dc.descriptionPresented on October 5, 2015 at 3:00 p.m. in the Howey Physics Building, Lecture Hall 3.en_US
dc.descriptionMatthew Fisher is a Professor at the University of California Santa Barbara School of Physics.
dc.descriptionRuntime: 68:09 minutes
dc.description.abstractQuantum mechanics is down to earth - quite literally - since the electrons within the tiny crystals found in a handful of dirt manifest a dizzying world of quantum motion. Each crystal has it’s own unique choreography, with the electrons entangled in a myriad of quantum dances. Quantum entanglement also holds the promise of futuristic Quantum Computers - which might be comprised of electron and nuclear spins inside diamond, or of atoms confined in traps, or of small superconducting grains, among a plethora of suggested platforms. In this talk I will describe ongoing efforts to elucidate the mysteries of Quantum Crystals, to design and assemble Quantum Computers, before ruminating about “Quantum Cognition” - the proposal that our brains are capable of quantum processing.en_US
dc.format.extent00:00 minutes
dc.format.extent68:09 minutes
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPhysics Colloquiumen_US
dc.subjectQuantum crystalsen_US
dc.subjectQuantum mechanicsen_US
dc.subjectQuantum computing
dc.titleQuantum Crystals, Quantum Computing, Quantum Cognitionen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Physicsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of California, Santa Barbaraen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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